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Kenyon College 



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A COLLEGE. 



A THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL. 



A PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



3®e 



1892 



s s 



1898 



— 1892 — — x 893 

Catalogue 



of 



Kenyon College, 

Gambier, Ohio. 



THREE DEPARTMENTS: 
A Collegiate School, A Theological School, 

Kenyon College. Bexley Hall. 

A Preparatory School, 

Kenyon Military Academy. 



COLUMBUS, OHIO: 

Nitschke Bros,, Book and Job Printers. 

1892. 



College dalenoar. 



1892. CHRISTMAS TERM. 

Sept. 13 — Tuesday Examinations for Admission. 

14 — Wednesday Term opens at 5 o'clock P. M. 

21 — Wednesday Preparatory School opens. 

Oct. 6 — Thursday Theological School opens. 

Nov. 1 — All Saints Day Founders' Day. 

24 — Thursday Thanksgiving. 

Dec. 21 — Wednesday Term Examinations begin. 

1893. EASTER TERM. 

Jan. 11 — Wednesday Term opens at 5 o'clock P. M. 

Feb. 15 — Wednesday Ash Wednesday. 

22 — Wednesday Washington's Birthday. 

Mar. 29 — Wednesday Term Examinations begin. 

31 — Friday Good Friday. 

April 2 — Sunday Easter. 

TRINITY TERM. 

April 5 — Wednesday Term opens at 5 o'clock P. M. 

May 11 — Thursday Ascension Day. 

June 25 — Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon. 

27 — Tuesday Examinations for Admission. 

28 —Wednesday Meeting of Alumni. 

29 — Thursday Commencement. 

29 — Thursday Meeting of Trustees. 

1893. CHRISTMAS TERM. 

Sept. 12 — Tuesday Examinations for Admission. 

13 — Wednesday Term opens at 5 o'clock P. M. 

20 — Wednesday Preparatory School opens. 

Oct. 5 — Thursday Theological School opens. 

Nov. 1 — All Saints Day Founders' Day. 

29 —Thursday Thanksgiving. 

Dec. 20 — Wednesday Term Examinations begin. 

1894. EASTER TERM. 

Jan. 10 — Wednesday Term opens at 5 o'clock P. M. 

Feb. 8 — Thursday Ash Wednesday. 

22 — Wednesday Washington's Birthday. 

23— Friday Good Friday. 

25 — Sunday Easter. 

Mar. 28 — Wednesday Term Examinations begin. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Calendar 2 

Kenyon College History 5 

Gambier 6 

College Grounds 6 

Buildings — 

Kenyon 7 

Ascension Hall 7 

Rosse Hall .. 7 

Hubbard Hall 7 

Church of the Holy Spirit 8 

Bexley Hall 8 

Milnor Hall 8 

Delano Hall 8 

Aids to Instruction 8 

Library and Reading Room 8 

Physics and Chemistry 9 

Mathematics and Astronomy 11 

Bedell Lectureship 11 

Bowler Lectures 11 

Physical Culture 11 

Assistance 12 

High School Scholarships 12 

Henry B. Curtis Scholarships 12 

Alfred Blake Scholarship 13 

French Prize Scholarship 13 

Hannah Moore Scholarship 13 

Clark Scholarship 14 

Mcllvaine Scholarship 14 

Austin Badger Scholarship 14 

Piatt Benedict Fund 14 

Ormsby Phillips Fund 14 

-Leonard Scholarship 15 

Teaching 15 

Foley Prizes in English 15 

Board of Trustees 16 

Standing Committees 18 

Officers of Instruction and Government 19 

The College 21 

College Faculty 23 

Students 24 

Requisites for Admission 27 

Advanced Standing 30 

Examination for Admission * 30 

Admission by Certificate. ... 30 

Admission without Greek or German 31 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



Courses of Study 32 

Departments of Study — 

Latin 35 

Mathematics and Astronomy. . . 36 

Greek 37 

Physics 38 

Chemistry 39 

English ; 41 

Modern Language 43 

Mental and Moral Philosophy 47 

History and Economics 49 

Rules and Regulations 50 

Matriculation 50 

Degrees 50 

Terms and Vacations 51 

Attendance and Examinations 51 

Public Worship 52 

Discipline 52 

Boarding and Lodging 52 

Expenses 52 

Theological Department — 

General Information 58 

Admission 58 

Matriculation 58 

Seminary Year 58 

Course of Study 59 

Theological Electives : 60 

Lectures 60 

Examinations 60 

Degrees and Hoods 60 

Expenses 61 

Prizes 61 

Library 62 

Services 62 

Missionary Society 62 

Kenyon Military Academy. 65 

Regents and Masters 68 

Cadets 69 

General Information 65 

Terms and Vacations 66 

Fees 66 

Uniforms 67 

Admission 67 

Kenyon Honor Men 73 

Valedictorians 74 

Register of Living Alumni . 74 



.Renyon College. 



The Institution now known as Kenyon College was re- 
moved from Worthington, Ohio, to Gambier in the year 1828. 
It had been incorporated, and a Constitution adopted by the 
Convention of the Diocese of Ohio, under the name of u The 
Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Ohio." By a supplementary act of the Legisla- 
ture, the President and Professors of the Seminary were em- 
powered to act as a Faculty of a College and confer degrees in 
the Arts and Sciences. 

After many changes of plan and some amendments to the 
Constitution, the final result was the establishment of three 
institutions — a Theological Seminary, a College, and a Pre- 
paratory School, each independent of the others, but all under 
the control of the Bishop of the Diocese and the Board of 
Trustees. The Bishop was ex-officio the President of the Board 
and President of the Theological Seminary. He had the power 
of nominating the President of the College, and during the 
recesses of the Board he acted as Prudential Committee, with 
full power to decide all secular matters arising at such times. 

In August, 1891, a new Constitution took effect, having 
received the assent of the Convention of the Diocese of Ohio, 
of the Board of Trustees, and of the Bishops of Ohio and of 
Southern Ohio. 

By the new Constitution the corporate name was changed 
from u The Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the Diocese of Ohio" to " Kenyon College." The 
three heretofore independent institutions were consolidated 
into one institution, of which institution the President of 
Kenyon College is the head. The Bishop of Ohio has gladly 
resigned most of his peculiar powers and privileges. He will 
preside alternately with the Bishop of Southern Ohio at the 
meetings of the Board of Trustees, and they retain a joint 
supervision of the spiritual interests of the institution. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



Instead of three independent institutions, there is one 
institution which includes three departments, or schools: A 
Theological school, Bexley Hall; a Collegiate school, Kenyon 
College, and a Preparatory school, Kenyon Military Academy. 

It is believed and expected that under the new Constitu- 
tion the success of Kenyon College will be increased and her 
usefulness promoted. That however well Kenyon may have 
done in the past, in the future she will do still better. The 
increased interest that has been aroused among the Alumni 
and the friends of the College is proof that the change in the 
Constitution was in the right direction, and has not been made 
in vain. 

Gambier, the seat of Kenyon College, is a village of about 
live hundred inhabitants, on the Cleveland, Akron 8c Colum- 
bus railroad, a little east of the center of the State of Ohio, 
fifty miles from Columbus, five miles from Mt. Vernon, and 
one hundred and twenty miles from Cleveland. The site was 
chosen by Bishop Chase, after careful investigation, for natural 
beauty of surroundings, healthfulness of climate, and freedom 
from influences that might prove detrimental to the physical 
and moral welfare of the students. The plateau on which the 
College and village is situated rises about two hundred feet 
above the valley of the Kokosing river, which flows around it 
on three sides, and which furnishes in the proper season excel- 
lent facilities for bathing and skating. 

The altitude of the College above the sea level is more 
than one thousand feet. Free from the objectionable qualities 
of the climate of the lake shore and of the Ohio valley, there 
is no spot in the State where the climate is more genial and 
healthful. 

COLLEGE GROUNDS. 

These consist, first, of the College Park, which contains 
seventy-five acres. This is made up of the beautifully shaded 
plateau, on which stand the College buildings and the pro- 
fessors' houses, with the well wooded hill sloping on one side 
directly down to the Kokosing river, and on the other to level 
ground, which furnishes an excellent field for base ball, foot 
ball, and other athletic sports. Second, the grounds connected 
with Bexley Hall, about five hundred yards north of the College 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



Park, which form a well shaded park of about five acres in 
the highest part of the village. Third, of the grounds con- 
nected with the Kenyon Military Academy. These grounds, 
about half a mile from Kenyon and a quarter of a mile from 
Bexley Hall, comprise about sixty acres. They afford large 
stretches of lawn, ample play grounds, and pleasant walks, as 
well as gardening, pasture, and meadow lands. 

BUILDINGS. 

At the southern end of the plateau, facing north, stands 
the massive stone building known as Old Kenyon. It has three 
stories and a high basement, and contains sixty rooms, mainly 
used as dormitories. The building is surmounted by a spire, 
which contains the College bell. "The thick walls of solid 
stone seem built for centuries; yet within, the rooms are light 
and cheerful, and with the broad window seats and appro- 
priate fittings, come as near, perhaps, to the ideal home of a 
student as could be desired for a four years' sojourn." 

Starting from the front of Kenyon is a broad walk, arched 
with maples, extending directly north about half a mile to 
Bexley Hall, known as the Path. On the eastern side of the 
Path, a short distance from Old Kenyon, stands the building- 
known as Ascension Hall. It was erected by the liberality of 
the parishioners of the Church of the Ascension, New York 
City. It is a beautiful structure of drab sandstone of Collegiate 
Tudor architecture. Here are the lecture rooms of the various 
professors, the physical and chemical laboratories, the astro- 
nomical observatory, the elegant halls for literary societies, 
the offices of the President and Treasurer, and eleven rooms 
for students. 

A little further to the north on the west side of the Path* 
on slightly rising ground, stands Rosse Hall, built of sand- 
stone, of Ionic architecture, about one hundred feet by seventy- 
five. It is the College Gymnasium, and is used at commence- 
ments, and at other times when room for large assemblies is 
required. 

Still further to the north, on the east side of the Path, 
stands Hubbard Hall. This is a handsome two-story structure 
of light colored sandstone, with a well planned and lighted 



KEN YON COLLEGE. 



interior. The lower story is used as the library proper, and 
the upper as a reading room. The walls are adorned with a 
number of valuable portraits, and engravings and photographs, 
the gift of Bishop and Mrs. Bedell. The building was erected 
by Mrs. Ezra Bliss, of Columbus, in memory of her brother. 

Beyond Hubbard Hall, on the same side of the Path, and 
near the Park gates, stands the beautiful Church of the Holy 
Spirit — the College Chapel. It is a cruciform building of early 
English architecture, with tower and spire at the northwest 
angle of the transept. The tower is furnished with a clock and 
a chime of bells. The interior is beautifully decorated, the 
wood work is of solid oak, its windows are memorial gifts, and 
it contains a fine organ. The Chapel affords sitting room for 
the College students, the Divinity students, the cadets of the 
Military Academy, with the respective faculties and teachers. 

At the north end of the Path, facing the south, stands, in 
its own park, Bexley Hall, the home of the Divinity school. 
It is a three-story brick building of Elizabethan architecture, 
a symmetrical and beautifully proportioned structure. It con- 
tains the Theological Library, a Chapel, lecture rooms for the 
professors, and rooms for the Theological students. 

About a quarter of a mile southeast of Bexley Hall stand 
the buildings of the Military Academy. They consist of two- 
large and substantial brick buildings. Milnor Hall and Delano 
Hall — the latter built through the liberality of the Hon. Co- 
lumbus Delano, of Mt. Vernon — a Drill Hall and Gymnasium 
one hundred by fifty feet, and other accessory buildings. They 
front the south and command a wide sweep of the Kokosing 
valley. They are heated by steam, and provided with bath 
rooms containing both hot and cold water, and have the best 
system of drainage. 

AIDS TO INSTRUCTION. 

The Library and Reading Room are housed in Hubbard 
Hall, which is entirely devoted to this purpose. The Library 
contains about twenty thousand volumes, well selected and 
thoroughly classified, and supplied with a card catalogue which 
gives easy reference to any volume on any subject in the 
Library. The Library has lately been enriched by the gift of 



KENYON COLLEGE. 9 



the private library of Mr. John Lewis, of Mt. Vernon. It con- 
tains many rare, curious and valuable mathematical and astro- 
nomical works. Also by the gift of many costly illustrated 
works, by Bishop and Mrs. Bedell. 

The Reading Room is supplied with a large number of the 
more important American and English and a few French and 
German weekly, monthly, and quarterly periodicals, literary 
and scientific, with abundance of Encyclopedias and Diction- 
aries, and with complete sets of the most important American 
and English magazines and reviews. 

The Library and Reading Room are in charge of a Libra- 
rian, whose entire time is given to their care and management. 
They are open daily, except Sundays, from 10 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 5 p. m., and on Saturdays from 7 to 9 o'clock p. m. 
There are devoted to the purchase of new books and binding, 
the proceeds of the Library fees, and the income of the Vaughan 
Library fund — five hundred dollars, and of the Hoffman fund 
— five thousand dollars. 

The Library of the Theological Seminary contains more 
than nine thousand volumes. This has recently been in- 
creased by the gift by Bishop Bedell of his large and valuable 
private library. Additions are made from time to time, chiefly 
through the income of the Betts library fund. 

Both the Libraries and the Reading Room are accessible 
to all connected with Kenyon College in any of its departments. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

This department is well supplied with apparatus new and 
costly, including many instruments adapted to accurate meas- 
urements. 

In electricity it includes galvanometers of many kinds, 
resistance coils, volt meters, ammeters, batteries of different 
sorts, a small dynamo, apparatus for magnetic measurements, 
apparatus for static electricity, induction coils, all the appli- 
ances for illustrating the modern applications of electricity, etc. 

The optical apparatus includes spectroscopes, a spectrome- 
ter, one of Rowland's concave gratings, prisms of the best 
quality, a polariscope, models to illustrate polarized light, a. 



10 KENYON COLLEGE. 



telescope, microscopes, a complete photographic outfit, a stere- 
opticon, apparatus for solar projection, etc. 

The acoustic apparatus includes a large number of pieces 
of Koenig's make, diapasons, organ pipes, a syren, a sonometer, 
etc., including a number of costly pieces to illustrate wave 
motion. 

In other divisions of Physics and Chemistry the apparatus 
is equally good and varied. 

Recently Laboratories have been provided for the student's 
practice in Physics and Chemistry. 

The Physical Laboratory is a well lighted room supplied 
with furnace-heat, and all the conveniences for individual 
work. In the center of the room has been placed a substantial 
pier, insulated from the floor and walls of the building and 
resting on foundations of masonry. The top of this pier is of 
polished sandstone, and will be used in adjusting and testing 
delicate measuring instruments and for experiments in mag- 
netometry. The department is supplied with micrometers, 
microscopes, balances, galvanometers, rheostats and all appara- 
tus required for the performance of those experiments which 
are so well adapted to train the eye and hand in refined use. 

The chemical laboratory includes a room for experimenta- 
tion in general chemistry, and one for analysis. Both are 
heated by a hot-air furnace, and are supplied with water and 
gas, and contain desks and lockers suited to their purpose. 
Each student has his own desk, chemicals, set of glass-ware, etc. 
The department has a very complete stock of chemicals, Bohe- 
mian glass-ware, furnaces, fittings, etc., for experimentation in 
general organic and inorganic chemistry, and qualitative and 
quantitative analysis and blow-piping, including two analyti- 
cal balances of great precision. 

The College is able to maintain this department in a high 
state of efficiency, having at its disposal annually, for the pur- 
chase of books and apparatus, the interest of about eight 
thousand dollars, part of the Bowler endowment of the Bowler 
chair of National Philosophy and Chemistry. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 11 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

The observatory has a telescope of five and one-fourth 
inches aperture, the object glass of which was made by Alvan 
Clark & Sons. This affords to students of astronomy the means 
of studying the most prominent celestial objects. The observa- 
tory is also supplied with a transit of two inches aperture and 
a sidereal clock. The Department of Astronomy has also a set 
of the well known Trouvelot astronomical drawings. 

For the use of students in surveying, the Department of 
Mathematics has an excellent transit, a Y level and a compass, 
with the necessary appurtenances. A series of field exercises 
in the use of these instruments is given in connection with 
text-book study. 

The income of one thousand dollars, the Delano Astronom- 
ical Fund, is used for the college observatory. 

THE BEDELL LECTURESHIP. 

A fund of $ 5,000 has been given to the College by Bishop 
and Mrs. Bedell for the establishment of a lecture or lectures on 
the evidences of Natural and Revealed Religion, or the Rela- 
tions of Science to Religion. These lectures are given bi-enni- 
ally on Founder's Day, the 1st of November. 

BOWLER LECTURES. 

A course of lectures is given annually by the Bowler Pro- 
fessor fof Natural Philosophy and Chemistry on the Unity of 
Design in Nature. These lectures, like the Bedell lectures, are 
open to all connected with the institution. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

Rosse Hall is used as a Gymnasium. It is supplied with a 
variety of apparatus, while its large area and high ceiling give 
room for exercises and drills of all sorts. It is open to students 
of the College and of Bexley Hall whenever the weather condi- 
tions are unfavorable for out of door exercise and at other 
times when desirable. 

The athletic grounds are all that is needed, being as good 
as any in the State. The Ball grounds are at the foot of the 
hill below Old Kenyon. They are not only excellent for the 



12 KENYON COLLEGE. 



players, but the shaded hill-side affords a charming point of 
view for the spectators. The Tennis courts are good and are 
much used. The country around Gambier is of great beauty, 
and tempts to long walks, all who have any love for nature. 

The College is a member of the Inter-collegiate Athletic 
Association of Ohio, and has taken part in all the contests, base 
ball, foot ball, tennis and other sports. 

LECTURES. 

A course of lectures and entertainments is gotten up every 
year under the patronage of the students. These lectures are 
intended to be entertaining and instructive and they help to 
vary the monotony of college life in winter. 

ASSISTANCE. 

Fees for tuition and room rent are remitted to sons of 
clergymen and to candidates for the ministry. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Resolution passed June 26, 1890, by the Board of Trustees 
of Kenyon College: 

Besolved, That a Free Scholarship in Kenyon College be 
offered each year to a male pupil of a High School in each 
county of the State. Such scholarship shall be granted upon 
the certificate of the Principal of the High School, which shall 
be based upon proficiency in studies, and upon good moral 
character. 

Should there be applicants from more than one High 
School in the same county, who shall obtain the necessary cer- 
tificates from their Principals, the Scholarship shall be given to 
the pupil passing the best competitive examination, held under 
the direction of the several principals. 

The Free Scholarship includes room rent and tuition. 

THE HENRY B. CURTIS SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Hon. Henry B. Curtis, L. L. D., has granted to the Trustees 
of Kenyon College a fund for the aid of meritorious students by 
loans of monev at a low rate of interest. The interest is 



KENYON COLLEGE. 13 



intended to meet only the risk of life, and is not to be greater 
than the average rate of life insurance. 

Application for a Henry B. Curtis scholarship must be 
addressed to the Secretary of the College Faculty, Gambier, 
Ohio, and must state the applicant's name, residence, age, his 
father's name and the amount asked for. The application is to 
be understood as confidential with the Faculty. In making 
the selections, the Faculty will consider all evidence that may 
be obtained as to the applicant's character, ability and merit, 
including his examinations in school and college, and his record 
for punctuality and other good conduct; the best evidence 
being the Faculty's personal acquaintance with the applicant. 
The appropriations will be made only for a year at a time. The 
scholarship is intended to help the student, but not to cover all 
his expenses. The maximum for one student for one year will 
be one hundred and fifty dollars, but for a student's first year in 
college, seventy-five dollars. The sum appropriated will be 
paid in equal parts, one at the beginning of each college term. 
Upon each payment the student will give his promissory note 
for the repayment in five years from date, with interest at the 
rate of one and one-half per centum per annum. 

THE ALFRED BLAKE SCHOLARSHIP. 

Three perpetual scholarships in Kenyon College, owned by 
the Rev. Alfred Blake, were donated by Mrs. Blake to the 
College for the benefit of deserving students, to be annually 
nominated by the President and Faculty. These scholarships 

entitle the holders to free tuition. 

■ 

THE FRENCH PRIZE SCHOLARSHIP. 

This is a perpetual scholarship in Kenyon College, w T hich 
was donated to the College by Mrs. Sarah A. M. French, to be 
held in trust by the trustees of the College, and to be awarded 
to a student of Milnor Hall standing highest in grade and 
deportment; other things being equal, preference to be given 
to a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

THE HANNAH MORE SCHOLARSHIP. 

This scholarship was established in 1835 by a bequest of 
two hundred pounds made by Mrs. Hannah More. The income' 



14 KENYON COLLEGE. 



is to be used by a student in the Theological Seminary. The 
fund now amounts to over twelve hundred dollars. 

THE CLARK SCHOLARSHIP. 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Lucy Clark in 
1835. The principal of the scholarship is $1,071, the interest 
on which is given to a theological student. 

THE MC'lLVAINE SCHOLARSHIP. 

This scholarship in the Theological Department was founded, 
by Bishop Mcllvaine, through a bequest in memory of a 
beloved son, who was deeply attached to Gambier. The prin- 
cipal of this scholarship now amounts to over four thousand 
dollars. The incumbent of the scholarship is to be appointed 
by the Board of Trustees on a nomination by the Faculty; and 
he must have completed a classical course in college, and the 
studies of the first year in the course of the Theological 
Seminary. 

THE AUSTIN BADGER SCHOLARSHIP. 

This is a fund bequeathed by the late Austin Badger, of 
Medina, " to the Trustees of Kenyon College at Gambier, Ohio, 
the income to be expended in defraying the expenses of such 
dependent and needy student in said college, preparing for the 
ministry in the Protestant Episcopal Church, as said Board of 
Trustees may designate." 

THE PLATT BENEDICT FUND. 

By the will of the late Piatt Benedict, of Norwalk, his store 
room in Whittlesry Block was left in trust to the Wardens and 
Vestry of St. Paul's Church in that city, the annual income of 
which should be paid over, u one -fifth part to the proper 
authorities of Kenyon College, to aid in the support and educa- 
tion of young men preparing themselves for the ministry in 
the Theological Department of said college." 

THE ORMSBY PHILLIPS FUND. 

This is a fund of a thousand dollars established by Mr. and 
Mrs. Bake well Phillips, of Pittsburgh, to be loaned, from time 



KENYON COLLEGE. 15 



to time, without interest to a superior student for the ministry. 
Nominations to this scholarship are made by the President of 
the College. 

THE LEONARD SCHOLARSHIP. 

This scholarship is the gift of Wm. B. Leonard and his 
wife, Louisa D. Leonard, of Brooklyn, New York. Its income 
is for the support of a student of Theology at Bexley Hall, and 
is to be paid annually to the Faculty of the Theological 
Seminary, for the use of such students as they may designate. 

TEACHING. 

Students whose grade of scholarship is high, can often add 
to their resources by tutoring during the Junior and Senior 
years. 

THE FOLEY PRIZES IN ENGLISH. 

The sum of one hundred dollars, given by Florence, Edna 
and William Foley, in memory of their mother, Hannah Foley, 
is annually distributed to members of the Senior, Junior and 
Sophomore Classes for excellence in English Composition and 
Declamation. These prizes are awarded as follows: Two 
prizes of thirty dollars and twenty dollars, for the best two 
essays prepared by members of the Senior Class on assigned 
subjects; five prizes — one of twenty dollars, two of ten dollars 
and two of five dollars — for excellence in public speaking, to 
be tested by a Rhetorical Exhibition, given during Com- 
mencement week, in which eight speakers, appointed equally 
from the Junior and Sophomore Classes, compete, delivering 
original orations. The privilege of competing for these prizes 
may be withheld from any student who has failed to do accept- 
able work in the regular English course. 



16 KENYON COLLEGE. 



3oar5 of Cmstees. 



THE RT. REV. WM. A. LEONARD, D. D Ex-officio 

Bishop of Ohio, President for the Year. 

THE RT. REV. BOYD VINCENT, D. D Ex-officio 

Assistant Bishop of Southern Ohio. 

THEODORE STERLING, M. D., LL. D Ex-officio 

President of Kenyon College. 

ELECTED UNDER CONSTITUTION. 
Article IV. 

TERM EXPIRES. 

The Hon. Columbus Delano, LL. D., Mt. Vernon .1901 

The Rev. C. S. Bates, D. D., Cleveland 1901 

Mr. H. S. Walbridge, Toledo 1899 

The Rev. Henry L. Badger, Portsmouth 1899 

The Hon. Channing Richards, Cincinnati 1897 

The Rev. A. F. Blake, Cincinnati 1897 

Mr. Charles E. Burr, Columbus 1895 

The Rev. A. B. Putnam, Cleveland 1895 

ELECTED BY THE CONVENTIONS OF THE DIOCESE OF OHIO AND 

SOUTHERN OHIO. 

Under Article V. 

TERM EXPIRES. 

The Hon. George T. Chapman, LL. D., Cleveland 1893 

Mr. Samuel Mather, Cleveland .1894 

The Rev. George F. Smythe, Mt. Vernon ... .1895 

The Rev. Dudley W. Rhodes, D. D., Cincinnati 1894 

Mr. R. M. Wood, Dayton 1895 

The Rev. R. A. Gibson, Cincinnati 1895 



KENYON COLLEGE. 17 

ELECTED BY THE ALUMNI. 
Under Article VI. 

TERM EXPIRES. 

The Rev. John H. Ely, College Hill 1893 

Mr. T. P. Linn, Columbus 1893 

The Rev. Henry D. Aves, Cleveland 1894 

Mr. J. A. J. Kendig, Chicago 1894 

The Rev. C. G. Currie, D. D., Baltimore 1895 

D. D. Benedict, M. D., Norwalk 1895 

ELECTED BY THE CONVENTIONS OF THE DIOCESE OF PITTS- 
BURGH, KENTUCKY AND MICHIGAN. 

Under Article VIII. 

DIOCESE OF PITTSBURGH. 

TERM EXPIRES. 

The Rev. George H. Rogers, Verona 

Mr. Bakewell Phillips, Pittsburgh 

DIOCESE OF KENTUCKY. 

The Rev. H. H. Sneed, Middleborough 1895 

Mr. F. P. Walcott, Covington 1895 

DIOCESE OF MICHIGAN. 

The Rev. Royal B. Balcom, Jackson 1893 

<Col. Jas. T. Sterling, Detroit 1893 



18 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Starring Committees. 



ON THE SCHOOLS. 

The Bishop of Ohio, The Rev. Dr. Bates, 

Colonel Jas. T. Sterling. 

ON FINANCE. 

Messrs. Delano, Burr and Richards. 

ON INVESTMENTS. 

Messrs. Mather, Wood and Chapman. 

ON LIBRARIES. 

The Rev. Dr. Rhodes, The Rev. Mr. Aves and Mr. Kendig. 

ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

President Sterling, The Rev. Mr. Badger, 

Mr. Walcutt. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE (ELECTED.) 

The Hon. Columbus Delano, The Rev. Geo. F. Smythe, 
The Rev. A. F. Blake, Chas. E. Burr, Esq., 

The Hon. Geo. T. Chapman. 

SECRETARY OF THE B: ARD. 

Rev. A. B. Putnam. . . . .1649 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

T. R. Head Agent 

R. S. Devol Treasurer 



KENYON COLLEGE. 19 



(Officers of instruction anb (government. 



THEODORE STERLING, M. D., LL. D., 

PRESIDENT. 

BOWLER PROFESSOR OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY AND CHEMISTRY. 

REV. EDWARD C. BENSON, A. M. 

PROFESSOR OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

RUSSELL S. DEVOL, A. M. 

PEABODY PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS. CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ASTRONOMY- 

REV. HOSEA W. JONES, D. D., 

ELE'JTHEROS COOKE PROFESSOR OF ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY, LITURGICS 
AND CHURCH POLITY. 

REV. JACOB STREIBERT, A. M., 

GRISWOLD PROFESSOR OF OLD TESTAMENT INSTRUCTION. 

REV. C. THEODORE SEIBT, S. T. D., 

MIL.NOR AND LEWIS PROFESSOR OF SYSTEMATIC DIVINITY. 
ACTING PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT INSTRUCTION. 



LESLIE H. INGHAM, A. M., 



PROFESSOR OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. AND ASSISTAN' 
PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

CHARLES FREDERICK BRUSIE, A. B., 

M'lLVAINE PROFESSOR OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



-• 



20 KENYON COLLEGE. 



WILLIAM N. GUTHRIE, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

WILLIAM FOSTER PEIRCE, A. M., 

-SPENCER AND WOLFE PROFESSOR OF MENTAL AND MORAL PHILOSOPHY, 
INSTRUCTOR IN HISTORY AND ECONOMICS. 

GUY HAMILTON BUTTOLPH, A. B., 

TUTOR IN LATIN AND CREEK. 

WILLIAM HAHN FOLEY, A. B., 

TUTOR IN FRENCH AND GERMAN. 

LAWRENCE RUST, M. A., LL. D., 

RECTOR KENYON MILITARY ACADEMY. 



ENSIGN ARMSTEAD RUST, 

ASSOCIATE RECTOR AND COMMANDANT. 



JOHN C. FLOOD, A. M., 

HEAD MASTER. 



ALLAN L. BURLESON, A. M., MINER T. HINES, A. M., 
J. B. GREENE, A. M., HENRY J. EBERTH, A. M., 

L. C. WILLIAMS, A. B. 

INSTECCTORS OF KENYON MILITARY ACADEMY. 

EMMA E. WRIGHT. 

LIBRARIAN. 



The College. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 23 



faculty of tfye dollegtate School 



THEODORE STERLING, M. D.. LL. D., 

PRESIDENT. 

BOWLER PROFESSOR OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY AMD CHEMISTRY. 

REV. EDWARD C. BENSON, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
INSTRUCTOR IN BIBLE HISTORY. 

RUSSELL S. DEVOL, A. M., 

PEABODY PROFEiSOR OF MATHEMATICS, CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ASTRONOMY. 

LESLIE H. INGHAM, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

CHARLES FREDERICK BRUSIE, A. B., 

M'lLVAINE PROFESSOR OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

WILLIAM N. GUTHRIE, A. M., 

PROFESSOR OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

WILLIAM FOSTER PEIRCE, A. M., 

SPELTER AND WOLFE PROFESSOR OF MENTAL AND MORAL PHILOSOPHY. 
INSTRUCTOR IN HISTORY AND ECONOMICS. 

GUY HAMILTON BUTTOLPH, A. B., 

TUTOR IN LATIN AND GREEK. 

WILLIAM HAHN FOLEY, A. B., 

TUTOR IN FRENCH AND GERMAN. 



24 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Stubmts. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

E. Burr Cochrane Portsmouth, O. 

John Dawson Follett Cincinnati, O. 

John Orson Miller East Saginaw, Mich. 

Robert Jesse Watson London, O. 

Benjamin Heber Williams Monroeville, O. 

Frank Andrew Yauger Mt. Vernon, O. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

William Buchtel Beck -. Akron, O. 

Alexander Hamilton Commins Akron, O. 

James Frederick Doolittle Gambier, O. 

Eugene Brooks Douthirt Indianapolis, Ind. 

William Russell McKim Norfolk, Neb. 

Walter M. Paazig Hunt's Station, O. 

Edward M. Phelps St. Mary's, Ol 

Norman Leslie Ranck Frackville, Pa. 

Clay Varner Sanford Portsmouth, O. 

John J. Shaffer London, O. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Frank Walker Alden Cincinnati, O. 

George Parkin At water Cleveland, O. 

Albert James Bell Cincinnati, O. 

Edward Burson Braddock. Mt. Vernon, O. 

Walter David Braddock Mt. Vernon, O. 

Dick Clippinger Toledo, O. 

Arthur Dumper Cleveland, O. 

Charles Pennebaker Mottle v Bowling Green, Ky. 

Lou Angus Sanford Portsmouth, O. 

Asa Raymond Williams Monroeville, O. 

Herbert Frith Williams Monroeville, O. 

George Frederick Williams Canton, O. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 25 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Oscar Sherman Adams Gambier, O. 

Willard Clark Armstrong Mt. Yernon, O. 

Charles Wilson Baker Mt. Yernon, O. 

Herbert Arthur Barber Wauseon, O. 

Arthur Herbert Brook Cincinnati, O. 

Levi H. Burnett Springfield, O. 

Charles Roland Cary Detroit, Mich. 

George Luther Clark Lytle, O. 

George Henry Eckerle Xenia, O. 

Charles Follett Cincinnati, O. 

Edward Melville Gould St. Louis, Mo. 

Robert LeRoy Harris Celina, O. 

William Joseph Ha worth Crestline, O. 

Howard Hollenbach Wellington, O. 

John Jay Hyatt Jelloway, O. 

Henry Clinton Jacobs Gambier, O. 

Harris Hartwell Kennedy Zanesville, O. 

Oscar Adelbert Knox Cuyahoga Falls, O. 

John O'Fallon Little Zanesville, O. 

Joseph John McAdoo North Bloomfield, O. 

Benjamin Perry McDonald Fort Scott, Kansas. 

Edgar Gilbert Martin Norwalk, O. 

George Sturgis May Defiance, O. 

Martin Myers Zanesville, O. 

William Pate, Jr Cleveland, O. 

Edwin B. Redhead Ashtabula, O. 

John A. Sipher Medina, O. 

Albert Wilson Slayton Springfield, O. 

Henry Stanberry Pomeroy, O. 

Carl Y. Semple Mt. Yernon, O. 

Harold Stiles Richmond, O. 

William A. E, Thomas Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Manley H. Thompson Zanesville, O. 

David Wilson Thornberry Cleveland, O. 



26 KENYON COLLEGE. 

Charles Valores Webb Salem, Ch 

Edgar Jones White Gambier, O. 

Earle R. Wilson Marion, O. 

Harry Howe Wolf Akron, O. 

Charles Chevrier Wright . . Akron, O. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Alfred Wm. Arundel Allegheny, Pa. 

Dwight Benton Rome, Italy. 

J. L. P. Clark Mansfield, O. 

Alfred L. M. Gottschalk New York. 

Edward Luke Griffith Ottawa, 111. 

Harry H. Hathaway Cleveland, O. 

Thomas Robert Hazzard Lima, O. 

John Howarth England. 

William Canfield Lee Manhattan, Kan. 

Edward Grant McFarland Alliance, O. 

Robert L. Means Kenton, O. 

Thomas Alford Schofield Findley. O. 

Robert Sheerin Pittsburg, Pa. 

Isaac Daniel Shlemon Oroomiah, Persia. 

Arthur Bull Sullivan New York 

Alfred James Wilder England 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 6 

Juniors . 10 

Sophomores 12 

Freshmen 39 

Special Students 16 

Total 83 



KENYON COLLEGE. 27 



Requirements for Ctbmtsstort 



I. ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS FOR ALL COURSES. 

(1) Geography. 

(a) Physical Geography. 

(6) Modern Political Geography. 

(2) History. 

Alexander Johnston's Shorter History of the United 
States or equivalent work. 

(3) Mathematics. 

(a) Arithmetic. In addition to the usual course in Arithme- 
tic an acquaintance with the Metrical System of weights 
and measures is required, and a thorough study of Men- 
tal Arithmetic is strongly recommended. 

(b) Algebra, through Radicals and Quadratics. 

(c) Plane Geometry. 

The use of simple drawing instruments should be taught 
in connection with Plane Geometry, and original con- 
struction and demonstrations required. 

(4) English. 

(a) English Grammar. 

(b) English Composition. The candidate may be required 
to write a short essay correct in spelling, grammar, 
punctuation, division by paragraphs, and general expres- 
sion. A subject will be assigned with which the candi- 
date is familiar. 

(c) A reasonable familiarity with English literature, 
prose and verse is expected. The following lists of read- 
ings required by the Association of New England Col- 
leges will suggest to the student, both the amount and 
the nature of the work demanded. 



28 KENYON COLLEGE. 



In 1893: Shakspere's Julius Csesar and Twelfth Night, 
Scott's Marmion, Longfellow's Courtship of Miles Stand - 
ish, the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spectator, 
Macaulay's second Essay on the Earl of Chatham, Emer- 
son's American Scholar, Irving' s Sketch Book, Scott's 
Ivanhoe, Dickens's David Copperfield. 

In 1894: Shakspere's Julius Csesar and Merchant of 
Venice, Scott's Lady of the Lake, Arnold's Sohrab and 
Rustum, the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Specta- 
tor, Macaulay's second Essay on the Earl of Chatham, 
Emerson's American Scholar, Irving' s Sketch Book, 
Scott's Abbot, Dickens's David Copperfield. 

In 1895: Shakspere's Merchant of Venice and Twelfth 
Night, Milton's L' Allegro, II Penseroso, Comus and 
Lycidas, Longfellow's Evangeline, The Sir Roger de Cov- 
erly Papers, Macaulay's Essay on Milton and on Addison, 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration, Irving's Sketch 
Book, and Scott's Abbot. 

II. EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION TO THE 

SEVERAL COURSES. 

A. For the Classical Course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. 

(1) Latin. 

(a) Grammar, including Prosody. 

(b) Jones's Latin Prose Composition to Chapter X. 

(c) Csesar, 4 books. 

(d) Cicero, 6 orations. 

(e) Virgil, 4 books of the JEneid. 

(2) Greek. 

(a) Grammar, including Prosody. 

(6) Twenty lessons in Jones's Greek Prose Composition. 

(c) Xenophon's Anabasis, 3 books. 

(d) Homer's Iliad, 1 book. 

Note — Goodwin's Grammar is used as a manual. Some 
simple reader or companion book of exercises should be 
used in connection with the grammar. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 29 

A hand-book, such as Baird's Classical Manual, should be 
studied in connection with Virgil and Homer. A good 
classical dictionary and a dictionary of antiquities are 
necessary to classical students. 

(3) Ancient Geography. 

(4) Ancient History. 

(a) Greek History, Fyffe's Primer of Greek History is 
required. 

(b) Roman History, Allen's History of the Roman People 
is recommended. 

B. For the Philosophical Course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 

(1) Latin, same as above for the Classical Course. 

(2) Ancient Geography, same as above for the Classical Course. 

(3) Ancient History, same as above for the Classical Course. 

(4) German. 

(a) Whitney's German Grammar, with especial attention 
to the idiomatic uses of interrogative, relative and indefi- 
nite pronouns, modal auxiliaries, the use of reflexive and 
impersonal constructions, the syntax of the conditional 
sentence, the object sentence, the result and purpose 
clauses, indirect discourse, the indirect question, the 
adjectival and the adverbial clauses. 

(b) Meissner's practical lessons in German conversation; 
first 25 lessons, or equivalent work of the same nature. 

(c) One hundred pages of Elementary Prose, Boisen's 
German Reader is recommended. 

(d) One hundred pages in Buchheim's Deutsche Lyrik, or 
an equivalent amount of easy German verse. 

(c) Vilmar and Richter's German Epic Tales told in prose. 

(d) Fouque's Undine. 

(e) Schiller's Der Neffe als Onkel. 

C. For the Scientific Course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. 

(1) Science. 

(a) Natural Philosophy, as much as is contained in Steele's 
Elements of Physics. 



30 . KENYON COLLEGE. 

(b) Chemistry, as much as is contained in Nichol's Abridge- 
ment of Eliot and Storer's Manual of Chemistry. 

(c) Botany, as much as is contained in Gray's Lessons in 
Botany. 

(d) Physiology, as much as is contained in Martin's Human 
Body (briefer course). 

(2) History and Political Science. 

(a) Universal History, as much as is contained in Myer's 
General History. 

(b) English History, as much as is contained in Mont- 
gomery's Leading Facts of English History. 

(c) Political Science, as much as is contained in John 
Fiske's Civil Government in the United States. 

(3) German, same as above for the Philosophical Course. 

Advanced Standing — Candidates for advanced standing 
are examined in the above studies, and in the studies that 
have been pursued by the class. 

Students from other Colleges in good standing, presenting 
letters of honorable dismission, may be admitted provisionally 
to such standing and on such terms as the Faculty may deem 
equitable in each case. Such candidates are required to pre- 
sent to the President a complete statement, duly certified, of 
the studies they have pursued and their proficiency therein. 
And this statement must be accompanied by a catalogue of the 
College from which they have come. 

Candidates for admission must present testimonials of 
good moral character; and if they come from other Colleges, 
certificates of dismission in good standing. 

The regular examination for admission to College takes 
place on Tuesday preceding Commencement, beginning at 8:30 
o'clock A. m. Another examination is held on the day before 
the opening of the Christmas term, at the same hour. Stu- 
dents may be examined for an advanced standing at any time 
before the commencement of the second term of the Senior 
year. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE. 

Any student applying for admission to the Freshman Class 
at the beginning of the Collegiate year will be admitted with- 



KENYON COLLEGE. 31 



out examination, provided he bring a satisfactory certificate 
from the Principal of a High School of any city in Ohio, or 
from the Principal of any reputable Preparatory School or 
Academy, that he has thoroughly done all the work prescribed 
in the catalogue for admission to the Freshman Class, and 
provided that the Principal will also state that, in his opinion, 
the applicant is able to maintain a good position in his class, 
and that he is of good moral character and habits. 

All certificates must be made out on blanks prepared for 
the purpose, which will be furnished on application to the 
President, and must be mailed so as to reach Gambier before 
the opening of the Christmas term. 

Teachers are requested not to give certificates unless 
clearly merited, but, in doubtful cases, to throw the responsi- 
bility on the Faculty. 

ADMISSION WITHOUT GREEK OR GERMAN. 

Graduates of High Schools of any city in Ohio, who lack 
preparation in Greek or German, can enter the Freshman 
Class, and opportunity will be given for them to begin either 
of these studies as College students, provided that, in addition 
to the requisites for admission as printed above, they are pre- 
pared to pass an examination in the following subjects : Alge- 
bra, to series including Logarithms; Solid Geometry, Botany, 
General History and Civil Government, and Physiology. 
Students who are not prepared to take their examination in 
these subjects may, provided they are industrious mid of good 
■abilities, by doing extra work, take these subjects in due course 
with the regular College classes. 

Students may be admitted as special studeuts, not candi- 
dates for a degree; provided their preparation is such that they 
can enter with advantage existing College classes, and also 
^provided that their time can be fully and profitably occupied. 



32 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



Courses of Stuby. 



CLASSICAL. 

Greek, 4 
Latin, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
English, 3 
Bible History, 1 



Greek, 4 
Latin 4 

Mathematics, 4 
English, 3 
Bible History, 1 



Greek, 4 
Latin, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
Botany, 3 
English, 1 



CLASSICAL. 

Greek, 3 
Latin, 3 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 3 
History, 3 
English. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

CHRISTMAS TERM. 
PHILOSOPHICAL. 

German, 4 
Latin, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
English, 3 
Bible History, 1 

EASTER TERM. 

German, 4 
Latin, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
English, 3 
Bible History, 1 

TRINITY TERM. 

German, 4 
Latin, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
Botany, 3 
English, 1 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

CHRISTMAS TERM. 
PHILOSOPHICAL. 

German, 3 
Latin, 3 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 3 
History, 3 
English. 



SCIENTIFIC. 

German, 4 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
English, 3 
Bible History, 1 



German, 4 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
English, 3 
Bible History, 1 



German, 4 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 4 
Botany, 3 
English, 1 



SCIENTIFIC. 



German, 3 
French, 3 
Physics, 4 
Mathematics, 3 
History, 3 
English. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



33 



CLASSICAL. 

Greek, 3 
Latin, 4 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 3 
History, 3 
English. 



Greek, 3 
Latin, 4 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 3 
History, 3 
English. 



CLASSICAL. 

Physics, 4 

Logic, 3 

English, 3 

French or Italian, 3 

Electives, 3 
Greek, Latin, Hebrew, 
Math., Prac. Physics. 



Physics, 4 

Psychology, 3 

English, 3 

French or Italian, 3 

Electives, 3 
Greek, Latin, Hebrew 
Math., Prac. Physics. 



Physics, 4 
Psychology, 3 



EASTER TERM. 
PHILOSOPHICAL. 

German, 3 
Latin, 4 
French, 4 
Mathematics, & 
History, 3 
English. 

TRINITY TERM. 

German, 3 
Latin, 4 
French, 4 
Mathematics, 3 
History, 3 
English. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

CHRISTMAS TERM. 
PHILOSOPHICAL. 

Physics, 4 

Logic, 3 

English, 3 

French, Ger. or Ital., 3 

Electives, 3 
Latin, Mathematics, 
Practical Physics. 

EASTER TERM. 

Physics, 4 

Psychology, 3 
English, 3 
French, German or 
Italian, 3 
Electives, 3 
Latin, Mathematics, 
Practical Physics. 

TRINITY TERM. 

Physics, 4 
Psychology, 3 



SCIENTIFIC. 

German, 3 
Physics, 4 
French, 3 
Mathematics, & 
History, 3 
English. 



German, 3 
Physics, 4 
French, 3 
Mathematics, 3 
History, 3 
English. 



SCIENTIFIC. 

Practical 
Physics, 4 
Logic, 3 
English, 3 
Mathematics, 3 
Electives, 3 
Surveying, 
German. 

Practical 

Physics, 4 
Psychology, 3 
English, 3 
Mathematics, 3 
Geometrical 

Electives, 3 
Drawing, 
German. 



Practical 

Physics, 4 



34 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



TRINITY TERM 



Continued. 



CLASSICAL. PHILOSOPHICAL. 

English, 3 ' English, 3 

French or Italian, 3 French, German or 
Electives, 3 Italian, 3 

Latin, Hebrew, Electives, 3 

Math., Prac. Physics. Latin, Mathematics, 

Practical Physics. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



CLASSICAL. 

Chemistry, 4 
Astronomy, 4 
Hist, of Philosophy, 3 
Amer. Constitutional 

History, 3 
English Literature, 2 



Evidences, 2 
Physiology, 4 
Metaphysics, 3 
Electives; any two 
of the following: 
Constitu'l History, 3 
English Literature, 4 
Chemistry, 4 



CHRISTMAS TERM. 
PHILOSOPHICAL. 

The same as 
Classical. 



SCIENTIFIC. 

Psychology, 3 
English, 3 
Mathematics, 3 

Electives, 
Descriptive 

Geometry, 
German. 



SCIENTIFIC. 

The same as 
Classical. 



EASTER TERM. 

The same as 
Classical. 



Evidences, 2 
Physiology, 4 
Chemistry, 4 

Electives; any two 

of the following: 

Metaphysics, 3 

Constitute History, 3 

English Literature, 4 



TRINITY TERM. 

The same as 
Classical. 



Geology, 4 

Ethics, 4 

Political Economy, 3 

Electives, 4 
English Literature, 
Chemistry, 

Note.— Numerals indicate the hours per week. 

Note. — During the Junior year Hebrew, and during the 
Senior year Old and New Testament Introduction and Exe- 
gesis are taken as electives by students intending to study 
Theology. 



Chemistry, 4 

Geology, 4 

Political Economy, 3 

Electives, 4 
Ethics, 
English Literature. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 35 



Department of iatin 



Professor Benson. 

The Freshmen begin with the Eclogues of Virgil or with 
the Metamorphoses of Ovid. Special regard is paid to Prosody 
and the reading of Latin verse. About six weeks are so spent. 
Books used are Greenough's Virgil or Allen and Greenough's 
Ovid. The remainder of the first and the whole of the second 
term are devoted to reading the first and second books of 
Livy. Careful translation and thorough grammatical 
construction are objects aimed at. Greenough's edition is used. 

The Sophomores read, in the first term, the First Tusculan 
of Cicero, the Somnium Scipionis and portions of the Laelius 
and of Cato Major. 

The second term is given to the Odes and Epodes of 
Horace, special attention being given to Metres. Either 
Chase's or Maclean's edition is used. 

The third term is spent upon the Satires and Epistles of 
Horace. Sight readings are held occasionally throughout the 
year. 

In the Junior year, Latin is an elective study. The 
Germania and Agricola of Tacitus, the De Officiis of Cicero and 
Plays of Plautus and Terence, are read during the year. Occa- 
sional sight readings take the place of the prepared lessons. 



36 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Department of HTatfyernattcs anb 
Gstronomy* 



Professor Devol. 

Six terms of work in Mathematics, covering the Freshman 
and Sophomore years, are required of all college students. Of 
these six terms, two are devoted to Algebra, one to Solid 
Geometry, two to Trigonometry and its applications, and one 
to Analytic Geometry. 

Students in the Scientific Course are required to continue 
mathematics through the Junior year, taking the Differential 
and Integral Calculus and a more extended course in Analytic 
Geometry. This third year in Mathematics may be taken by 
students in the Classical and Philosophical Courses as elective 
work. 

Opportunity will be afforded to students in the Scientific 
Course to elect Geometrical Drawing, Descriptive Geometry, 
and further work in Surveying. 

One term's work in Astronomy is required of students in 
all of the college courses. 

The text books used in this department during the coming, 
year will be the following : 

Wells' College Algebra. 

Wells' Plane and Solid Geometry. 

Wells' Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

Wentworth's Surveying. 

Bowser's Analytic Geometry. 

Bowser's Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Young's General Astronomy. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 37 



Department of (Breek language anb literature. 



Professor Ingham and Mr. Buttolph. 

Greek is required of all candidates for the degree of A. B., 
during the Freshman and Sophomore years, and is offered dur- 
ing the Junior year as an Elective. 

Goodwin's Greek Grammar, Goodwin's Greek Moods and 
Tenses and Liddell & Scott's Greek Lexicon are used as manuals 
throughout the course. The course will be changed somewhat 
from year to year. 

I. Freshman year, first term: Select Oration of Lysias, 
Steven's text, three hours per week; Greek Prose Composition, 
Jones, one hour per week. 

II. Freshman year, second term: Homer's Iliad, Sey- 
mour's text, three hours per week; Jones's Greek Prose Com- 
position, one hour per week. 

III. Freshman year, third term: Homer's Odyssey, 
Merry's Edition, Lectures on Ionic Dialect, three hours per 
week; Boise's Greek Syntax, one hour per week. 

IV. Sophomore year, first term: Plato's Apology and 
Crito, Dyer's Edition, three hours per week; Greek Literature, 
one hour per week. 

V. Sophomore year, second term: Demosthenes on the 
Crown, Tyler & Holmes' Edition, three hours per week; 
Greek Literature, Jebb's Primer, one hour per week 

VI. Sophomore year, third term: Antigone of Sophocles, 
D'Ooge's Edition, readings from Oedipus Tyrannus and lec- 
ture on Mythology, etc., four hours per week. 

VII. Junior year, first term: Greek History, illustrated by 
readings from Herodotus, Xenophon, Thucydides and Minor 
Historians, four hours per week. 

VIII. Junior year, second term: Agamemnon of Aeschylus, 
Sidgwick's Edition, four hours per week. 

IX. Minor Greek Lyric Poets, Bergk's Anthologica Lyrica, 
lecture on Greek Archaeology; four hours per week. 



38 KENYON COLLEGE. 

Department of physics. 

Dr. Sterling and Professor Ingham. 

I. — Four hours per week during the Junior Year are given 
to the study of Physics by the students in the Classical and 
Philosophical Courses, and four hours per week during the 
Sophomore Year by students in the Scientific Course. 

The text books used are Dana's Mechanics, Stewart's 
Physics and Thompson's Electricity and Magnetism. The 
students are also required to provide themselves with Jones's 
Examples in Physics. 

The text books will be ^supplemented by lectures, of 
which the students will be required to take notes, and all the 
important laws of Physics will be illustrated by the aid of 
abundant and excellent apparatus at the disposal of the De- 
partment. 

II. — The course of Practical Physics is required of all 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science, but is offered 
to other students as an Elective. 

The course consists of personal experimentation in the 
Physical Laboratory, accompanied by lectures and recitations 
on methods of manipulation, the theory of instruments, and 
discussion of results, corrections and computation of errors. 

The endeavor is not merely to train the eye and hand, nor 
to explain any mechanical device, but to inculcate a habit of 
orderly and scientific thinking. 

The first term of the Junior Year is occupied with 
preliminary practice in the simple measurements of length, 
mass and time, followed by the mechanics of solids, liquids 
and gases, and thermometry and expansion. 

The second term is a continuation of the first, taking up 
acoustics, optics, determination of wave length, interfer- 
ence, etc. 

The third term is devoted to electricity and magnetism, 
together with the calibration of instruments. 

The text books used are Glazebrook and Shaw's Practical 
Physics, Pickering's Physical Manipulation, Stewart & Gee's 
Practical Physics, Ganot's Physics, Thompson's Electricity and 
Magnetism, Chute's Physics, Tait on Heat and Light, and 
Louis Wright on Light. 



KNNYON COLLEGE. 39 



Department of dfyemistry. 



Pbofessor Ingham. 

I. — A course of one term in General Chemistry is required 
of all candidates for a degree. This course is taken in the first 
term of the Senior Year, and consists of recitations from the 
text hook and from authorities cited by the instructor. The 
course is illustrated by occasional lectures, and by experiments 
before the class In addition to this, the members of the class 
will perform most of the simpler experiments in the labora- 
tory, under the supervision of the instructor. Five hours per 
week, including about twenty exercises in the laboratory. 
Text book, Remsen's Chemistry, advanced course. 

II. — The courses in Chemistry for the second and third 
terms of the Senior Year are required of candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, and are open to other students 
as Electives. 

During the first part of the second term a rapid review of 
experiments in General Chemistry will be made. Text book, 
Williams' Chemistry. 

This will be followed by a course in Qualitative Analysis, 
Noyes' text book being used in preliminary practice in the 
separations, with Prescott, Johnson and Fresenius as manuals. 
Four exercises per week. 

III. — The course during the third term will be one or the 
other of the following, as the majority of the class may select : 

1. — A continuation of Chemistry ( II.), including the deter- 
mination of the more complex and of insoluble substances, 
analysis for poisons, sanitary analysis of water, with simple 
exercises in Quantitative Analysis. Text and reference books, 
O' Brine's Laboratory Guide, Fresenius' Quantitative Analysis, 
Plattner's Analysis and Sutton's Volumetric Analysis. 



40 KENYON COLLEGE. 



2. — Lectures and recitations in Organic Chemistry, to- 
gether with practice in simple Organic Preparations and in 
Ultimate Analysis. The students will also review Chemical 
Literature. Remsen's Organic Chemistry, Thorpe and Fre- 
senius' Manuals of Analysis. 

The laboratory will be open to students of Courses II. and 
III. daily from 4 to 6 p. m. 

Geology, Physiology and Botany are taught by Dr. Ster- 
ling. The text books used are LeConte's Geology, Martin's 
Human Body (advanced course) and Gray's Lessons and 
Manual. 




KENYON COLLEGE. 41 



Department of €nglisfy 



Professor Brusie. 

1. Rhetoric — A. S. Hill's Rhetoric is used as a text-book. 
The principles of composition are studied, and practical work 
is done in the preparation of essays, criticisms, etc., and in the 
rapid writing of themes and outlines in the class room. 
Reviews of books assigned by the instructor are required of 
students in this and the following course. Three hours a week 
during the first term, Freshman year. 

2. The work of the preceding term is continued with a 
view to the acquirement of a clear and forcible prose style. 
Minto's Manual of English Prose is used in the class room, and 
selections from the authors treated in Part I. are critically 
examined. Three hours a week during the second term, Fresh- 
man year. 

3. One hour a week during the third term, Freshman 
year, is devoted to the examination before the class of criti- 
cisms and reports on literary subjects assigned by the instructor. 

4. At the beginning of each term a list of literary subjects 
is announced, from which each member of the Sophomore 
class selects one for original investigation. The result of this 
investigation is then embodied in a thesis, which must be in 
the hands of the instructor two weeks before the end of the 
term. 

5. English Literature of the Age of Elizabeth, with intro- 
ductory lectures on Early and Middle English. The works of 
Sidney, Spencer, Bacon and the Elizabethan Dramatists are 
studied. The plays of Shakespeare are, however, only inci- 
dentally touched upon in this course. Three hours a week 
during the first term, Junior year. 

6. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. This 
course consists of readings in the class-room from the principal 



42 KENYON COLLEGE. 



poets and prose writers of the period, with extensive outside 
reading in contemporaneous authors. Three hours a week 
during the second term; Junior Required; Senior Elective. 

7. English and American Literature. Some one phase of 
the Literature of the present century is selected for investiga- 
tion, and representive authors are critically read. Outside 
reading. Three hours a week during the third term; Junior 
Required; Senior Elective. 

In courses six and seven the same authors will not he 
studied two years in succession. This will enable Seniors to 
elect work in these courses, and so devote two terms to the 
study of each one of these periods, if they choose to do so. 

8. History of English Literature. Brooke's Primer with 
supplementary reading; reports on assigned topics. Two hours 
a week during the first term, Senior year. 

9. Shakespeare. The critical study of selected plays 
according to the plan outlined in Moulton's Shakespeare as a 
Dramatic Artist. 

10. Milton. An examination of his principal works, and 
a study of his character in its relation to the times in which he 
lived. Outside reading in contemporaneous authors. 

11. The Engligh Novel. A study of the origin and 
development of the novel, with extensive reading in the works 
of the great novelists. 

12. Early and Middle English. Sweet's Anglo-Saxon 
Primer, Judith, and selections from Beowulf; Chaucer, Pro- 
logue, and selections from the Canterbury Tales. 

During the second and third terms, two courses, chosen 
from 9, 10, 11 and 12, are given as Senior Electives; four hours 
week. 

In connection with all the work of the Junior and Senior 
years frequent written reports on assigned topics are required. 

Individual training in declamation is given to students 
during the Freshman year, and this work is continued in the 
Sophomore and Junior years by practice in the writing and 
delivering of orations. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 43 



Department of ZTTobern languages. 



Professor Guthrie. 

The courses in German and French are parallel, so that 
what is said of one will do for the other also, except that no 
previous preparation is required in French. 

During the first year, which may be called the Grammar Year , 
the instructor will use English in the class room, but a course of 
oral prose composition and, later on, of conversation, will 
serve to familiarize the student with the spoken tongue, which 
he studies more or less as a dead language during the other 
recitations. Having learned, then, to co-ordinate sound with 
sense, in the second and third years the pupil will receive 
instruction in the German language, avoiding all translation 
and substituting paraphrase for it, to insure the instructor that 
what has been read has also been understood. It is hoped that 
bythis method the student will acquire a feeling for usual idioms 
and a facility in understanding German without any process 
of mental translation. The second year will be devoted to the 
classic literature; the third to what is more difficult in it, and 
to a study of earlier poetry, with as much philology as will be 
necessary for a thorough appreciation of its merits. 

It will be seen by consulting the schedule of the several 
courses, that the Bachelor of Science will have obtained such 
a practical acquaintance with both French and German as will 
allow the use of scientific and philosophic works in either 
language. 

The course in Italian, being elective during the Junior 
year only, is intended to meet the long-felt want among 
students of literature of a brief introduction to Italian classic 
poetry, especially to Dante. 

In the schedule of courses very few definite works are 
specified, as the reading will, in most cases, vary from year to 
vear. 



44 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Scfyebule of Courses, 



FRENCH. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Christmas Term — (a) Grammar Review, Easy Prose Read- 
ings; 3 hours every week. 

(b) Oral Translations into French; 1 hour per week. 
Easter Term — (a) Syntax, with exercises; 1 hour per week. 

(b) Prose Readings; 2 hours per week. 

(c) Conversation; 1 hour per week. 

Trinity Term — (a) Selections from Classics in prose and 
verse; 2 hours, and 3 in alternate weeks. 

(b) Exercises in Syntax and Dictation; 1 hour per week. 

(c) Elements of French Literature History; 1 hour 
each alternate week. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Christmas Term — (a) Two Comedies of Moliere; 3 hours 
per week. 

(b) Sight reading of French comedies; 1 hour per week. 

(c) Essay ( in French ); on French Comedy. 

Easter Term — (a) A Tragedy of Corneille, and one of 
Racine; 3 hours per week. 

(b) Sight reading in essays; 1 hour per week. 

(c) Essay (in French); French Tragedy of the 17th 
Century. 

Trinity Term — (a) A Tragedy of Voltaire and one of 
Hugo; 3 hours per week. 

(b) Sight readings in standard novels; 1 hour per week. 

(c) Essay (in French); on the Romantic Drama of 
France. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Christmas Term — (a) French Prose Style, studied in 
specimens from essays, histories, novels, aphorisms, etc; 2 
hours, and 3 hours alternate weeks. 

(b) Course in Historical Grammar; 1 hour each alter- 
nate week. 

(c) Sight reading of standard works; 1 hour per week. 
Easter Term — (a) Representative selections of Modern 

French poetry; 2 hours per week. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 45 



(b) Grammar and Syntax of Old French; 1 hour per 
week. 

(c) Sight reading of contemporaneous Literature; 1 

hour per week. 

Trinity Term — (a) Anthology of Old French Literature, 
with specimens of Provencial; 2 hours per week. 

(b) Sight readings of Criticisms on Old French Litera- 
ture; 2 hours per week. 

(c) Essay on the aesthetic value of Old French Lit- 
erature (in French); 2,000-3,000 words. 

GERMAN. 
§ FIRST YEAR. 

Christmas Term — (a) Grammar Review, reading in prose 
and verse; 3 hours per week. 

(b) Oral translations into German; 1 hour per week. 
Easter Term — (a) Syntax, with exercises; 1 hour per week. 

(b) Prose Readings; 2 hours per week. 

(c) Conversation; 1 hour per week. 

Trinity Term — (a) Selections from Classics in prose and 
verse; 2 hours and 3 hours alternate weeks. 

(6) Exercises in Syntax and Dictation; 1 hour per week. 
(c) Elements of German Literature History; 1 hour 
each alternate week. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Christmas Term — (a) A tragedy of Schiller and drama of 
Lessing; 3 hours per week. 

(b) Sight reading of light German Comedies; 1 hour 
per week. 

(c) Essay (in German) on Schiller's Tragedy. 

Easter Term — (a) A tragedy of Schiller and one of Goethe; 
3 hours per week. 

(6) Sight reading of critical and humorous essays; 1 
hour per week. 

(c) Essay (in German) on Goethe's Tragedy. 
Trinity Term — (a) Goethe's Autobiography and Lessing' s 
Laokoon; 3 hours per week. 

(6) Sight reading in standard novels; 1 hour per week. 

(c) Essay (in German) on the literary awakening of 
Germany, 18th Century. 



46 KENYON COLLEGE. 



THIRD YEAR.. 

Christmas Term — (a) Select German prose; 2 hours and 3 
hours alternate weeks. 

(6) Historical, German grammar; 1 hour each alternate 
week. 

(c) Sight reading in standard works; 1 hour per week. 
Easter Term — (a) Goethe's Faust, Parts I. and II.; 2 hours 
per week. 

(b) Grammar and Syntax of Old High German; 1 hour 
per week. 

(c) Sight reading from Contemporaneous Literature;. 

1 hour per week. 

Trinity Term — (a) Anthology of Old German Literature; 

2 hours per week. 

(b) Sight reading of Criticisms on the same; 2 hours 
per week. 

(c) Essay (in German) on Niebelungen Lied; 2,000- 
3,000 words. 

ITALIAN. 

Christmas Term — (a) Italian Grammar and Syntax. 

(b) Easy Readings and Exercises in Syntax. 

(c) Elements of Italian Literary History. 

Easter Term — (a) A tragedy of Alfieri and six odes of 
Leopardi; 2 hours per week. 

(b) Selections from Classic and Modern Literature; 1 
hour per week. 

(c) Sight reading in Goldoni's Comedies; 1 hour per 
week. 

Trinity Term — (a) Dante's Vita Nuova and Inferno; 2 hours 
per week. 

(b) Sight reading of Modern Italian Literature; 2 hours, 
per week. 

(c) Essay on Dante and Milton; 2,000-3,000 words. 



KE^TYON COLLEGE. 47 



Department of Hlental ano ITloral 

pfyilosopfyy. 



Professor Peirce. 

A continuous course of study extending throughout the 
Junior and Senior years is offered in this department. 

1. Logic and Psychology. 

This course occupies three hours a week throughout the 
Junior year. The work is divided between the three terms 
thus: 

(a) Christmas Term — Logic. 

Jevons is used as a hand-book, and is made the basis for 
drill in the fundamental principles of the science, while the 
comparison of the views of various authors on certain special 
questions is insisted upon, lectures on the Theory of Logic are 
given from time to time by the instructor, and an endeavor is 
made to familiarize the student thoroughly with the founda- 
tion of the subject. 

(6) Easter Term — Psychology. 

The Briefer Course in Psychology of Professor James is 
used in the class room. In accordance with his arrange- 
ment, the Physiological basis of the science is first discussed, 
with constant illustrations and with experiments in the 
laboratory. A careful critical comparison of Prof. James with 
the older school of Psychologists is made at every step and 
independence of thought on the part of the student is made 
the prime object of the course. 

(c) Trinity Term — Psychology. 

Continuation of the work of the Easter Term, with special 
attention to the more abstract and theoretic questions of 
Psychology. At least one-third of the time is devoted to 



48 KENYON COLLEGE. 



laboratory work, each student being assigned a special subject 
for investigation which will require original thought in the 
determination of methods and the compilation of results. 

2. Philosophy and Ethics. 

This course covers the whole of the Senior year. 

(a) Christmas Term — History of Philosophy. 

A brief, but systematic and critical outline of Ancient, 
Mediaeval and early|Modern Philosophy is presented during 
this term. Seelye's translation of Schwegler's " History of 
Philosophy," is the text book used. 

(6) Easter Term — Metaphysics. 

On the foundation of the outline of the History of 
Philosophy furnished by the work of the Christmas Term a 
more thorough critical discussion of Metaphysical questions is 
pursued by the study of one or two particular systems of 
Philosophy. The course will probably vary somewhat from 
year to year, the systems to be studied being chosen from the 
most influential modern Philosophers. In 1894, the systems of 
Hume and Kaut will form the subject of the course. 

(c) Trinity Term — Ethics. 

This course occupies four hours a week and is devoted to 
both the History and Theory of Ethics. Conscience, moral 
law, the will, and the ultimate ground of moral obligation are 
discussed historically and scientifically. A text book is used 
simply as the basis of suggestion for free discussion between 
instructor and student. Essays on ethical questions form an 
important factor in the work. 

PSYCHOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

In order to secure a better and clearer understanding of 
the problems of Psychology, especially on their Physiological 
side, a laboratory furnishing ample opportunity for illustration 
and experiment in that department is at present in process of 
construction and will be ready for use in 1893. The apparatus 
will be sufficient, not only for regular class room experiments, 
but also for individual research on the part of the student. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 49 



Department of history anb (Economics. 



Professor Peirce. 

1. Mediaeval and Modern European History. 

This course of three hours a week extends through the 
Sophomore year. Fisher's outlines of Universal History is 
made the basis of the work, and the private reading of histori- 
cal authorities is an integral part of the course. Reports to 
the class are made from time to time by each student on his 
individual work, and on these reports every member of the 
class is liable to examination. The course seeks primarily to 
familiarize the students with the great historical authorities and 
to encourage original thought and criticism on historical 
questions. Lectures on special subjects are delivered from 
time to time. The period of history covered by the course 
extends from the fall of the Roman Empire and the Great 
Migrations to the present day, special attention being devoted 
to the present state and living problems of Europe. 

2. American Constitutional History. 

This course is offered during the first two terms of the 
Senior year and includes the whole period from the beginnings 
of the spirit of independence to the completion of reconstruc- 
tion. Outside reading and private investigation of special 
subjects form the principal part of the course, Johnston's 
"American Politics" being the only book used in the class 
room. At least one paper on an extended study of some parti- 
cular subject is required each term from every student. 

3. Economics. 

The Trinity Term of the Senior year is devoted to this 
course. During this limited time little more than a discussion 
of the elementary principles of the science is possible. A 
small text book, either Walker, Marshall or Andrews, is made 
a basis, and a large part of the recitation is devoted to debate 
on economic theory and its application to pressing social and 
industrial questions. 



50 KENYON COLLEGE. 



(Beneral 3nformation. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



MATRICULATION. 

A student is admitted to matriculation when he has sus- 
tained a satisfactory probation. Matriculation gives accredited 
membership in the Institution, and entitles the student to an 
honorable dismission, and is essential to his obtaining a degree. 
Each student, when matriculated, signs the following obliga- 
tion: 

We, the undersigned, pupils of Kenyon College, being 
now admitted to the rite of matriculation, do promise, each 
for himself : 

I. That we will faithfully observe and' obey the laws and 
regulations of the College, and all authoritative acts of the 
President and Faculty, so long as we are connected with the 
College; and as far as may be in our power, on all occasions we 
will give the influence of our good example and precept to 
induce others in like circumstances to do the same. 

II. As faithful sons of Kenyon College, we will render to 
her as our Alma Mater, at all times and on all occasions, due 
honor and reverence, striving to promote her welfare by all 
proper means, and abstaining carefully from all things that 
may tend to impair her influence or limit her usefulness as a 
seminary of learning. 

The matriculation fee is five dollars, payable upon 
entrance. 

DEGREES. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon all stu- 
dents of the classical course in good standing who are approved 
at the final examination of the Senior class. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 51 

The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy is conferred upon 
all students of the Philosophical Course in good standing who 
are approved at the final examination of the Senior class. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon all 
students of the Scientific Course in good standing, who are 
approved at the final examination of the Senior class. 

The degree of Master of Arts is conferred on Bachelors of 
three years' standing, who have pursued a year's study in some 
branch of the Liberal Arts, under the direction of the College 
Faculty. For Bachelors graduated before 1883, the rule 
remains as published before that date. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The College year is divided into three terms — Christmas, 
Easter, and Trinity. 

The Commencement is held on the Thursday before the 
last day of June. 

There is a vacation of three weeks at Christmas, and of 
one week at Easter. For particular dates see calendar. 

ATTENDANCE AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Students not in their places at the opening of the term 
must show by written statement, from their parents or guar- 
dians, that the absence was necessary. 

When a student is necessarily absent from Gambier, and 
in cases of clear physical disability, known as such at the time 
by the Faculty, absences may be excused by special Faculty 
action. A student is not held morally accountable for such 
absences, and they are not considered in estimating his deport- 
ment grade; but in deciding the question whether or not a 
student shall be examined at the end of the term, all absences- 
are counted. Regularity in the performance of all College 
duties is important for the welfare not only of the individual 
student, but also of his class, and any student who persistently 
neglects these duties will be required to leave College. 

It is deemed unnecessary to examine, at the end of the 
term, those students who are regular in their attendance upon 
their College duties, and who show by their class work that 
they are well qualified to proceed with the studies of the next 
term. 



52 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Any student who fails to make a term grade of seventy- 
five in any study is examined in that study at the end of the 
term. 

Any student who is absent from more than one-tenth of 
the recitations in any study is examined in that study at the 
end of the term. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Students are required to attend Morning Prayers in the 
College Chapel; also the public services on Sundays and on 
the principal Holy Days of the Church. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The Faculty reserve the right to suspend or remove any 
student, whenever they believe that the interests of the College 
require such action. 

BOARDING AND LODGING. 

Rooms are provided in the College building in which 
students must lodge, unless they obtain permission from the 
President to room elsewhere. The College makes no special 
provision for board. This can be readily obtained in private 
families, or, at times, in clubs. 

Each room is sufficiently large and convenient to accom- 
modate two students. The rooms are provided with stoves, 
and are neatly painted and papered by the College. Students 
provide their own beds, furniture, light, books and stationery. 
Furniture can often be bought, as well as sold, at second hand, 
and the expense incurred by its use need not be great. 

EXPENSES. 

The College charges are: For Tuition, $25.00 per term; 
for Room Rent, $5.00 (at least) per term; and for Incidentals, 
$10.00 per annum. A matriculation fee of $5.00 is charged to 
every student at his entrance. There are some minor expenses, 
consisting of taxes voluntarily imposed by the students in 
their classes and their literary societies, and the expenses of 
graduation. 

Each student must keep on deposit with the Treasurer 
$5.00 as security for damages. Any balance is returned to the 
student at the close of each year. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 53 



When a student is absent for a term, and is afterward T 
upon examination, allowed to go on with his class, tuition is 
charged for the time of his absence. Room rent is charged 
when a room is reserved for a student. 

Fuel (wood) is supplied by the agent of the College, and 
must be paid for in advance, at the same time with the bill for 
tuition. The charge is $6.00 per term for the first and second 
terms, and $3.00 for the third term; and twice these sums 
when a room is occupied by a single student. 

If the student prefers to burn hard coal instead of wood, 
which is believed to be the better and more economical plan, 
he must provide himself with a stove. The use of soft coal is 
not allowed. 

Board in private families costs from $3.50 to $4.00 per 
week. Clubs are sometimes formed, and the expense for board 
is thereby materially reduced. 

Students are not , allowed to board themselves in their 
rooms, as this practice has been found to be perilous to health. 
The following estimate may be given of the annual ex- 
penses, not including expenses in vacation: 

Tuition $75 00 $75 00 

Room Rent 15 00 to 50 00 

Incidentals 10 00 10 00 

Fuel 12 00 to 30 00 

Board ... 100 00 to 152 00 

Washing 15 00 25 00 

Lights 2 00 to 5 00 

Library Fee 3 00 3 00 

$232 00 $350 00 
Other incidental expenses, such as books and stationery, 
furniture, expenses in societies, traveling expenses, etc., vary 
according to circumstances, and the character and habits of 
the individual student. 

The College bill must be paid in advance, according to the 
following rule of the Trustees: 

"All students shall be required to pay their regular term 
bills in advance. The Treasurer's receipt shall be required by 
the President before he shall sign a certificate of matricula- 
tion, or, after the first term, before the student shall attend 
recitations." 



Theological Department 



BEING THE 



Theological Seminary of the Dioceses 

in Ohio. 



56 KENYON COLLEGE. 



faculty of tfye etiological School. 



THEODORE STERLING, M. D., LL. D., 

PRESIDENT. 

REV. HOSEA W. JONES, D. D., 

ELEUTHEROS COOKE PROFESSOR OF ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY AND CHURCH 
POLITY. DEAN OF THE FACULTY. 

REV. JACOB STREIBERT, A. M., 

GRISWOLD PROFESSOR OF OLD TESTAMENT INSTRUCTION, 

REV. C. THEODORE SEIBT, S. T. D., 

MILNOR AND LEWIS PROFESSOR OF DOGMATIC THEOLOGY. 

ACTING PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT INSTRUCTION. 



BEDELL PROFESSOR OF NEW TESTAMENT INSTRUCTION. 



INSTRUCTOR IN LITURGICS AND CHRISTIAN EVIDENCES. 



LECTURER ON PASTORAL THEOLOGY AND THE BOOK OF ACTS, 

THE BISHOP OF OHIO. 

LECTURER ON SCIENCE AS RELATED TO NATURAL THEOLOGY, 

THE BOWLER PROFESSOR OF THE COLLEGIATE 

DEPARTMENT. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 57 



etiological Stuoertts. 

SPECIAL. diocese. 

D wight Benton, Jr Southern Ohio 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Rev. Allan L. Burleson, A. M Ohio 

Rev. Owen J. Davies, A. B . . . . Ohio 

Rev. William J. Hawthorne Ohio 

William H. Lewis Ohio 

Alfred L. Moore Ohio 

Cassius M. Roberts, A. B Southern Ohio 

Townsend Russell Ohio 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

Frank W. Bope Southern Ohio 

George L. Freebern Ohio 

Edward A. Moore, A. B Ohio 

George W. Preston, A. B Southern Ohio 

Charles T. Walkley, A. B Southern Ohio 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Edward S. Barkdull. Ohio 

Samuel J. Boardman, A. B . Ohio 

Edward S. Doan Ohio 

Louis E. Durr, A. B Southern Ohio 

John A. Howell, A. B Southern Ohio 

COLLEGE STUDENTS PURSUING THEOLOGICAL ELECTIVES.* 

William R. McKim 

John O. Miller Michigan 

Norman L. Ranck Central Pennsylvania 

Frank Yauger 

PREPARING FOR THEOLOGICAL STUDIES. 

J. Louis P. Clarke Ohio 

Harry St. C. Hathaway Ohio 

Thomas R. Hazzard Ohio 

William C. Lee Kansas 

Edward G. McFarland Ohio 

Isaac D. Schlemon 

Thomas A. Schofield Ohio 

Alfred J. Wilder Southern Ohio 

* These Theological Electives cover the greater part of the 
work of the Junior Year in the Theological Course. 



58 KENYON COLLEGE. 



(General 3nformatton. 



ADMISSION. 

Any candidate for Priest's Orders in the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church of the United States, with full qualifications 
according to Title I, Canon 4, Section 2, may be received as a 
student of the Seminary; and any other person who may give 
sufficient evidence of a fair moral and religious character, and 
of such literary qualifications as will enable him successfully 
to pursue Theological studies. Applicants for admission are 
requested to address the Dean. 

MATRICULATION. 

Every student, on being admitted to full standing, must 
subscribe the following declaration in the Matriculation Book 
of the Seminary: 

"We, the subscribers, students of the Theological Semi- 
nary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the Dioceses of 
Ohio, do solemnly promise, with reliance on Divine Grace, 
that we will faithfully obey the laws and pursue the studies 
thereof, endeavor to promote the reputation and interests of 
the Seminary, and make daily efforts, by pious reading, self- 
examination, and secret prayer, to cultivate all religious and 
moral dispositions and habits, and grow in those graces which 
should characterize the Christian and Minister of the Cross." 

SEMINARY YEAR. 

The year begins on the first Thursday in October, and 
closes the last week in June. Vacations coincide with those of 
the College Course, as stated in the Calendar. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 59 



dourse of Stuby* 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Hebrew — Harper's Elements of Hebrew and Introductory 
Method. Reading from Historical Books of the O. T. 

Old Testament Introduction and Old Testament History. 

Harmony of the Gospels. 

New Testament Introduction. 

Ecclesiastical History of the First Four Centuries. 

Liturgies — Recitations and Lectures. 

Lectures on Homiletics; writing of Sermons. Exercises in 
Elocution. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

Hebrew — Harper's Elements of Hebrew Syntax. 

O. T. Exegesis — Poetical Portions of the Pentateuch, and 

Psalms. 
N. T. Exegesis — St. Paul's Epistles. 
Ecclesiastical History — Mediaeval Period. 
Christian Evidences. 
Dogmatic Theology. 
Ethics. 
Liturgies. 
Homiletics. Exercises in Elocution. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

O. T. Exegesis — Prophetical Books of the Old Testament. 

New Testament Exegesis— St. Paul's Epistles. 

Ecclesiastical History — Reformation and Post-Reformation 

Period. History of the American Church. 
Dogmatics — Lectures, and Browne on the Thirty-nine Articles. 
Ecclesiastical Polity and Canon Law. 
Christian Ethics. 
Liturgies. 
Pastoral Theology and Homiletics. 



60 KENYON COLLEGE. 



THEOLOGICAL ELECTIVES. 

Special attention is called to the fact that a course of 
Theological Electives has been arranged for students in Ken- 
yon College, by means of which the greater part of the work 
of the Junior Seminary year is done during the Junior and 
Senior years in College. The student in this way obtains his 
A. B. degree in course, and shortens his Seminary course, after 
leaving College, from three years to two. The ground which 
these electives cover may be ascertained by consulting the 
College Schedule. 

LECTURES. 

In addition to lectures by the professors, the Bishops of 
Ohio and Southern Ohio, and the Bowler Professor of the 
Collegiate Department, lectures will be given during the year 
by the Rev. George Hodges, D. D., of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Rev. 
W. M. Brown, Archdeacon of the Diocese of Ohio, on "Anglo- 
Catholicism in the Seventeenth Century," and others. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

A public examination of each class is held previous to the 
Annual Commencement, and certificates are awarded to those 
who, on the final examination, are found to have satisfactorily 
pursued the full course of study. 

DEGREES AND HOODS. 

1. All examinations for degrees will be conducted by the 
Faculty on Tuesday preceding Commencement week, and on 
Tuesday preceding the first Thursday in October. 

2. The degree of B. D. will not be conferred on any candi- 
date who is not in Priest's Orders; but graduates of a Theo- 
logical school may take the required examination at any time 
before or after their Ordination to the Diaconate, and receive 
the degree at the Commencement following their advancement 
to the Priesthood. The examination for the degree of B. D. 
will be both oral and written, and will embrace the following 
subjects: In Exegesis, Messianic portions of the Old Testa- 
ment, the Gospels, and one of St, Paul's Epistles, all in the 
original; in Ecclesiastical History, the First Three Centuries 



KENYON COLLEGE. 61 



and the English Reformation; in Dogmatic Theology, Soter- 
iology, and the Doctrine of the Sacraments; in Liturgies, the 
Book of Common Prayer. 

3. Candidates for the degree of D. D. must be graduates of 
an incorporated College or a Theological School, and must have 
been at least ten years in Priest's Orders. They must present 
an original essay in Latin or Greek on some subject connected 
with Theology. They must also, in the presence of the 
Examiners, write two theses in English on subjects from 
Ecclesiastical History and Dogmatic Theology, assigned them 
at the time of the examination, and they must be prepared to 
read in the original and comment upon selected portions of 
the Old and New Testament. 

4. In exceptional cases, the degree of D. D. may be con- 
ferred honoris causa upon a Bishop or Priest of the Church 
who has distinguished himself as an author in theological 
literature. 

5. The Hoods adopted by this Seminary are of the Oxford 
shape; that of Bachelors of Divinity of black silk, lined with 
violet silk; and that of Doctors of Divinity, of scarlet cloth, 
lined with white silk. 

EXPENSES. 

No charge is made for instruction, room rent, permanent 
furniture, or use of Library. Text books and movable furni- 
ture (such as bedding, towels, etc.,) are to be provided by 
students. 

Aid will be given to properly qualified students, by scholar- 
ships, or by the Joint Education Committee of the Dioceses of 
Ohio and Southern Ohio. 

Board (38 weeks) costs from $114 00 to $133 00 

Fuel, from . 15 00 to 20 00 

Washing, from 15 00 to 20 00 

Lights, from 3 00 to 5 00 

Total, from $ 147 00 to $ 178 00 

PRIZES. 

The u Pierre Jay Prize " of one hundred dollars is awarded 
to the student presenting the best essay on the subject of 
Foreign Missions. This prize is given by Miss Elizabeth 
Clarkson Jay, of New York City. 



62 KENYON COLLEGE. 



The "Van Nostrand Prizes" are six in number. Four of 
these, consisting each of books to the value of ten dollars, will 
be conferred by the four professors for distinguished excellence 
in the work of their respective departments. The other two, 
consisting each of books to the value of five dollars, will be 
conferred by the Faculty upon the two students who shall excel 
in preaching extempore and written sermons, respectively. 

LIBRARY. 

The Library has been enlarged during the year by the gift 
of the valuable library of Bishop Bedell, and now contains 
about nine thousand volumes. Additions are made from time 
to time, chiefly through the income of the "Charles D. Betts 
Library Fund." The students also have access to the excellent 
Library and well-equipped Reading Room of the College. 

SERVICES. 

There is daily service, morning and evening, and Holy 
Communion on Sundays, Holy Days, and every Thursday, in 
the Seminary Chapel. The students are appointed in turn to 
read the lessons for the day. 

BISHOP BEDELL MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

The Society, in which all the students are members, meets 
once a month to listen to an essay on some field of Missionary 
work, a biography of some Missionary, and a resume of note- 
worthy events bearing upon the subject. 



Preparatory School; 

Kenyon Military Academy 



KENYON COLLEGE. 65 



£emjon military Ctcabemy. 



The studies are arranged to accommodate three classes of 
boys. The Classical Course prepares for the Collegiate classi- 
cal department. The Semi-Classical substitutes German for 
Greek, and prepares for the Philosophical Course. The Scien- 
tific Course prepares for the Scientific Course and for any 
scientific school and the Government schools at West Point and 
Annapolis, and is intended also to meet the wants of boys 
who do not intend to go to College, but who leave school to 
enter upon the active business of life. 

The Rector and his family, with the masters and cadets, 
occupy the same buildings and form one household. 

An elegant gymnasium, 50x100 feet, was completed in 
1889. It has been supplied with apparatus, under the direction 
of Dr. Sargent, Director of the Hemenway Gymnasium at 
Harvard College. Under an experienced teacher of gymnas- 
tics, regular physical training in the gymnasium is prescribed 
for all cadets during the winter months. 

The military drill secures to the cadets regular and system- 
atic exercise. Besides securing healthful and agreeable 
exercise, it tends to give an erect carriage and good manners; 
and it promotes habits of order and obedience, important 
elements of success both at school and in after-life. 

The cadets attend daily services of prayer at the Academy, 
and the public religious worship on Sunday at the College 
Church. On Sunday afternoon there is either a half hour's 
study of the Bible or a lecture on some religious subject. 

It is a very common mistake to send boys who are too 
young, to be subjected to temptation, to the preparatory 
department of some college where the pupils room about in a 
large town, and enjoy at too early an age the privileges of 



66 KENYON. COLLEGE. 



college students. This system has the merit of being cheap. 
The pupils receive very little personal oversight, and they pay 
for little. 

While this system is quite common west of the Alleghe- 
nies, in the older states the conclusion has generally been 
reached that young boys require a closer supervision than this 
system provides. 

At a good training school the pupils live in the school 
building, and are under charge of experienced masters. In 
the evening they study in the school room, under the direction 
of an experienced teacher. The advantages of this system 
can hardly be overestimated. 

It is aimed to provide here a school where, under influences 
that tend to the development of Christian character, boys will 
receive efficient and careful instruction and training, intellec- 
tual and moral. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The scholastic year is divided into three terms. The first 
term begins on the third Wednesday in September. There is 
a vacation of three weeks at Christmas, and one of one week 
at Easter. The year closes on the fourth Thursday in June. 
Cadets are received only for the entire year, or the remainder 
of it, if it has begun. No deduction will be made on account 
of withdrawal or other absence, except for an absence of more 
than six weeks on account of sickness, when six dollars a week 
will be refunded for the time lost. 

SCHEDULE OF FEES. 

Tuition, Board, Washing (1J dozen), Fuel and Lights for 

the School Year $ 450 

Payable at Entrance $ 225 

Payable at Beginning of Second Term 225 

$450 

A fee of five dollars is required on entrance for medical 
attendance for the year. This practically is an insurance 
against any large medical bills, as it enables us to contract 
with a physician to visit the sch6ol and care for the sick 
every day. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 67 



An itemized statement of account will be rendered at the 
•end of each term. 

No money will be advanced for clothing, except on a 
written order of parent or guardian. 

Wilful damage to school property is charged to the 
perpetrators, if known; otherwise, it is assessed upon the 
whole school. 

All bills not paid promptly are subject to sight draft, with- 
out notice. 

Cadets who remain at the Academy during vacation are 
•charged at the rate of seven dollars a week, and they are 
subject to such regulations as are deemed necessary. 

All checks should be made payable to the order of H. N. 
Hills, Treasurer. 

UNIFORMS. 

Two suits, a dress and a fatigue, similar to those worn at 
West Point, have been adopted for the Academy. These suits 
should be procured from the Academy tailor, that there may 
he no variation in shape or color. The cost of the two 
uniforms is forty dollars, and of the cap and helmet five dollars 
and a half. 

ADMISSION. 

Catalogues and blank forms of application for admission 
-to the Academy may be obtained from the Rector. 

All communications, concerning the Academy, should be 
addressed to Lawrence Rust, Rector. 



68 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Hegents, 



LAWRENCE RUST, M. A., LL. D., 

RECTOR. 

H. N. HILLS, A. M., 

TREASURER. 



masters 



ENSIGN ARMISTEAD RUST, U. S. Navy, 

SUPERINTENDENT AND COMMANDANT, 

INSTRUCTOR IN MATHEMATICS. 

JOHN C. FLOOD, A. M., 

HEAD 31 ASTER, 

INSTRUCTOR IN LATIN. 

REV. ALLAN L. BURLESON, A. M., 

CHAPLAIN, 

INSTRUCTOR IN LATIN AND ENGLISH.. 

MINER T. HINES, A. M.> 

INSTRUCTOR IN GREEK. 

J. B. GREENE, A. M., 

INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH. 

H. J. EBERTH, A. M. T 

INSTRUCTOR IN GERMAN. 

L. C. WILLIAMS, A. B., 

INSTRUCTOR IN NATURAL SCIENCE. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 69 



Carets. 



FIFTH FORM. 

"* William Dominick Blake Cincinnati 

* Charles Fawcett Goodwin East Liverpool 

Frank Milton Hawley. Cleveland 

Charles Mills Hubbard Hartford City, Ind. 

Samuel Minot Jones Logansport, Ind. 

John Nelson Kendig Chicago, 111. 

* Arthur Frederick Scherer Newport, Ky. 

John Edwin Weighell Hartwell 

* Back in one study. 

FOURTH FORM. 

Clarence Hamilton Alden Newport, Ky. 

Charles Horace Branum Bridgeport 

Guy Joy Derthick Johnstown 

William Townsend Graham, Jr Bridgeport 

John Dunham Hawes Chicago, 111. 

William Stewart Hays Galion 

Harry M. Hossler Greenwich 

Frank H. Ikert. . East Liverpool 

George Todd Irvine .... Middletown 

Charles Henry Kleinhans Topeka, Kan. 

George Karl Kunst Weston, W. Va. 

Harry Raymer Leib . Chicago, 111. 

Albert Metzger Mt. Vernon 

Henry Brown Mirick Washington, D. C. 

Reuben Harolde Mull Philipsburg, Pa. 

Clark Perrin Kansas City, Mo. 

Edward C. Ranney Cleveland 

William Develcourt Rawlins, Jr Chicago, 111. 

Norman Gowdy Rice Petoskey, Mich. 



70 KENYON COLLEGE. 



George Bonner Robinson Tionesta, Pa. 

Philo S. Ruggles Cleveland 

Philemon Beecher Stanbery, Jr Pomeroy 

Russell Rice Taylor Saugatuck, Mich. 

Thomas Odiorne Youtsey. Newport, Ky. 

THIRD FORM. 

George Orr Anderson East Liverpool 

Joseph Gaff Andrews Cincinnati 

Louis Ivas Cheney ... .Union City, Pa. 

Charles Alfred Duerr Ontario 

Frank Noah Flickinger Galion 

Charles Ransom Ganter Akron 

George Wilson Heiser Cleveland 

Oliver Everett Johnson Dixon, 111. 

Roy McCormick Bluffton, Ind. 

Roy E. Moon Muskegon, Mich. 

Carlton Wadhams Morgan . . South Bend, Ind. 

Frank T. Morgan Cleveland 

Lawrence John Mull Philipsburg, Pa. 

Albert Woodruff Newton Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Samuel Shaw Phister Newport, Ky. 

Raymond Edgerton Preble Cleveland 

Emanuel Manasa Reis Cincinnati 

Edmund Jennings Lee Rust. Leesburg, Ya. 

William Rice Saltzgaber Van Wert 

Charles Elam Samson, Jr Ypsilanti, Mich. 

John Boswell Sneed Middlesborough, Ky. 

George Al vin Straw Carey 

Hale Sturges Mansfield 

Morton Cranage Tilden Detroit, Mich. 

Emerson Locke Warman Gambier 

George Reagh Warman Gambier 

William Worthington Webster Dayton 

Frank Albert Werner Akron 

Guy Yoorhees Williams Portsmouth 

SECOND FORM. 

Harry Sheffield Bramwell Lincoln, 111. 

William Henry Brown Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Miles Clifford Burdsal Cincinnati 



KENYON COLLEGE. 71 



Norman W. Church Toledo 

Henry Wood worth Clum San Bernardino, CaL 

Don Henry Crim Galion 

Edward Darst Daly Toledo 

Albert Somers Dean Mingo Junction 

Chester Miller Flood Elmira, N. Y. 

Addison Delameter Folsom Cleveland 

John Taintor Foote Gambier 

Charles H. Hall East Liverpool 

Robert Taggard Hall East Liverpool 

Thomas Eccleston Hay ward Washington, D. C. 

Fred Booth Huseman Wheeling, W. Va. 

Max Hayes Karlsruher Cincinnati 

Otis Bush Mallow Washington Court House 

Lemuel James Mason Chillicothe 

George Jay Myers Ashland 

Frank Kimmell Neill Wheeling, W. Va. 

Charles Jacob Seager Philipps Toledo 

William Rattle, Jr Cuyahoga Falls 

Steven Collier Rawlins Chicago, 111. 

Baird Gale Saltzgaber Lebanon, Ind. 

Eugene Knoop Scott Troy 

Samuel Roberson Sneed Middlesborough, Ky. 

Paul Arthur Sorg Middletown 

Roscoe Williams Sturges Mansfield 

Richard Marvin Werner Akron 

Frank Thayer Wood Akron 

FIRST FORM. 

Frederick Augustus Baldwin Fort Scott, Kan, 

Jay Lansford Beatty Toledo 

Edward McKinnie Bean Canton 

Edwin Mathews Blumenthal Chicago, 111. 

Harold Godwin Foote Gambier 

William Adam Foresman Circleville 

Frederick Joseph French Detroit, Mich. 

John Remington Frew . . Coshocton 

Dean Ruskin Low Topeka, Kan. 

Edward Samuel Rosenthal Cincinnati 



72 KENYON COLLEGE. 

SUMMARY. 

California 1 Missouri 1 

District of Columbia 1 New York 1 

Illinois 8 Ohio 59 

Indiana 6 Pennsylvania 5 

Kansas 3 Virginia 1 

Kentucky 6 West Virginia 3 

Michigan 6 Tota l 101 

SUMMARY OF ALL DEPARTMENTS. 

College Students 83 

Seminary Students 30 

Academy Students 101 

214 



Counted twice 13 



Total 201 



KENYON COLLEGE. 73 



£enyon pernor lYien. 



Class of 1885. 

WILLIAM TAPPAN. 

JOHN ADOLPH FRITSCH. 

CHARLES EDWARD MILMINE. 

ERNEST MILNOR BENEDICT. 

GEORGE WILLIAM DORMAN WEBSTER. 

Class of 1886. 

ARTHUR STANHOPE DUDLEY. 
GEORGE CLARK COXE. 
HUGH BARRETT CLEMENT. 

Class of 1887. 

CHARLES HUNTINGTON YOUNG. 
JAMES HENRY YOUNG. 
GEORGE ARTHUR REID. 
WILLIAM HERBERT DEWART. 
CLEVELAND KEITH BENEDICT. 

Class of 1888. 

JOHN D. SKILTON. 
WALSTEIN F. DOUTHIRT. 
HARRY C. DEVIN. 

Class of 1889. 
HENRY JACOB EBERTH. 
GEORGE DUDLEY YOUNG. 
EDWARD THOMAS MABLEY. 

Class of 1890. 

JOHN FRANCIS WILSON. 
LEE HUNTINGTON YOUNG. 

Class of 1891. 
OWEN JOHN DAVIES. 

Class of 1892. 
HENRY W. BUTTOLPH. 
GUY H. BUTTOLPH. 



74 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



Dalebtctortans of £ertyon 



FROM ITS FOUNDATION. 



1830 No honors assigned 

1831 No honors assigned 

1832 No honors assigned 

1833 Sherloch A. Bronson 

1834 No honors assigned 

1835 William Hodges 

1836 Peter S. Ruth 

1837 John Ufford 

1838 Henry L. Richards 

1839 John W. Marsh 

1840 Edward W. Syle 

1841 Edwin B. Hale 

1842 Rutherford B. Hayes 

1843 George Thompson 

1844 Benjamin L. Lang 

1845 Jacob A. Camp 

1846 .... Andrew W. Benedict 

1847 Solomon N. Sanford 

1848. . . .Columbus S. Doolittle 

1849 Edward C. Benson 

1850 Moses M. Granger 

1851.Etherington T. Spangler 

1852 Henry H. Morrell 

1853 Henry D. Lathrop 

1854 Moses Hamilton 

1855 James M. Leduc 

1856 George T. Chapman 

1857 John W. McCarty 

1858 Frederick M. Gray 

1859 Charles H. Young 

1860 Joseph Packard 

1861 William W. Lathrop 



1862. Alexander Y. G. Allen 

1863 Edwin L. Stanton 

1864 William Hyde 

1865 George Coburn 

1866 John P. Holloway 

1867 John H. Burton 

1868 JohnB. Leavitt 

1869.... Charles D. Legget 

1870 George W.Cass 

1871 William M. Harrison 

1872 William H. Strong 

1873 Lewis W. Burton 

1874 William T. Colville 

1875 Robert M. O'Ferrall 

1876 Charles C. Fisher 

1877 Henry D. Page 

1878 William T. Wright 

1879 ... No honors assigned 

1880 Grove D. Curtis 

1881 .... No nonors assigned 

1882 ErnestS. Cook 

1883. . . Andrew L. Herrlingcr 

1884 Irving Todd 

1885 William Tappan 

1886 Arthur S. Dudley 

1887 Charles H. Young 

1888 John D. Skilton 

1889 Henry J. Eberth 

1890 John F. Wilson 

1891 Owen J. Davies 

1892 Henry W. Buttolph 



KENYON COLLEGE. 75 



Ctlumm of £enyon dollege* 



1829 

James Balloch Chase, A. M 



1831 

Rev. James C. Wheat, D. D Lyhnwood, Va. 

1833 

Rev. Richard K. Meade, A. B Charlottesville, Va. 

1834 

Rev. Thomas E. Locke, A. B Glendower, Va. 

Francis B. Meade, A. B 

1835 

John B. Foster, A. M Athens, Tenn. 

1836 

George E. Hogg, A. B Brownsville, Pa. 

Rev. Peter S. Ruth, A. M Pomona, Cal. 

1837 

Rev. Charles Edward Douglass, A. M 

1838 

Andrew E. Douglass, A. M 9 E. 54th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wm. H. Johnson, A. B 

Wm. Richards, A. M 1527 R. I. Ave., Washington, D. C. 

Henry Livingston Richards, A. M 

36 Church Street, Winchester, Mass. 

1839 

Dr. Ebenzer S. Lane, A. M. . .2116 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

1840 

Gen. Anthony Banning Norton, A. M Dallas, Texas 

Rev. William Speer, A. B Chicago, 111. 

Prof. John C. Zachos, A. M. .Cooper Institute, New York, N.Y. 

1841 

Rev. Henry Calhoun, A. B Mansfield, Ohio 

Milton Elliott, A. B ... Astoria, Oregon 

Rev. William C. French, D. D 

4226 Chester Avenue, West Philadelphia, Pa. 



76 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Rev. Richardson Graham, A. B., 2226 Orthodox Street, 

Philadelphia Pennsylvania 

Hon. Sydney C. Long, A. M. . 305 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 
Hon. Rowland E. Trowbridge, A. B 

1842 

J. Milton Boyd, A. B Hillsboro, Ohio 

Hon. Guy M. Bryan, A. M Galveston, Texas 

Leander Comstock, A. B Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hon. Rutherford B. Hayes, LL. D Fremont, Ohio 

Rev. Ovid A. Kinsolving, D. D Halifax C. H., Va. 

Rev. Joash Rice Taylor, A. M., 381 Bleeker Street, 

New York, N. Y. 

Hon. William F. Turner, A. B Independence, Kan. 

1844 

Rev. John Boyd, D. D Marietta, Ohio 

1845 

Jacob A. Camp, A. M 

James M. Smith, A. B 34 Central Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

1846 

Rev. Thomas Barker Lawson, D. D Belleville, Texas 

Rev. Rodney S. Nash, A. M. Springfield, Mo. 

1847 

Alexander W. Griffith, A. M .... Farm Ridge, 111. 

Hon. Alfred M. Hoyt, A. M 1 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Hon. Manuel May, A. M. . . Mansfield, Ohio 

Solomon Noble Sanford, A. M Cleveland, Ohio 

1848 

John W. F. Foster, A. B Athens, Tenn. 

Gen. William Gates LeDuc, A. M Hastings, Minn. 

Joseph Lindley, A. M. 

Shepherd Jay Patrick, Esq., A. B Norwalk, Ohio 

Hon. William K. Rogers, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

Dr. William J. Scott, LL. D Cleveland, Ohio 

Hon. David Turpie, LL. D Indianapolis, Ind. 

1849 

Prof. Edward C. Benson, A. M. . , Gambier, Ohio 

Rev. Richard L. Chittenden, A. M Paradise, Pa. 

Peter Neff, A. M Cleveland, Ohio 

William H. Scott, A. M 46 W. 19th St., New York, N. Y. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 



Stephen B. Burgess, A. .B 53 Liberty St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. George Edward Thrall, A. M. . . . . 

1850 

William H. Bowers, A. M 

Col. Moses Moorhead Granger, LL. D Zanesville, Ohio 

Col. Emory Washburn Muenscher, A. M. .Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Abner Starkey, A. B 

Rev. George Augustus Strong, Litt. D., 51 Brewster 

Street Cambridge, Mass. 

Rev. Jessie B. Thomas, D. D Newton Center, Mass. 

1851 

Dr. Edwin Hodges Grant, A. B Anacostia, D. C. 

Louis S. Lobdell, A. B., Duvall Landing, West Baton 

Rouge Parish Louisiana 

William Humrickhouse, A. B Coshocton, Ohio. . . . 

1852 

Hon. John S. Brasee, A. M Lancaster, Ohio 

H. S. Bell, A. B 34 St. Charles St., New Orleans, La. 

Rev. John Hochuly, A. B. Fairfield, Iowa 

Rev. James Trimble, A. M., 125 Spring Avenue, Sioux 

Falls South Dakota 

1853 

Rev. Henry Durant Lathrop, D. D., 512 Fifteenth St., 

East Oakland California 

Rev. Henry G. Perry, A. M. . . .79 Oakley Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Dr. Homer Thrall, A. B Columbus, Ohio 

1854 

Leigh ton Brooke, A. B West Point, Va. 

Rev. Moses Hamilton, A. M Bellevue, Ohio 

Dr. Charles Hervey James, A. M., D. D. S. . .Cincinnati, Ohio 

1855 

Hon. Joseph Hart Larwill, A. B Mansfield, Ohio 

Rev. Henry H. Messenger, A. M Beaumont, Texas 

Rev. D. Brainard Ray, A. M., 114 East Ninety-third 

Street Harlem, New York, N. Y. 

1856 

Dr. David De Forest Benedict, A. M Norwalk, Ohio 

Hon. George T. Chapman, LL. D Cleveland, Ohio 



78 KENYON COLLEGE. 



George F. Dawson, A. B., Lake Maitland, Orange 

County Florida 

Rev. Richard Leo Ganter, D. D Akron, Ohio 

Col. John E. Hamilton, A. B Covington, Ky. 

Thomas Meeker James, A. M., 314 Massachusetts 

Building Kansas City, Mo. 

Oren Smith Penney, A. M., Conshatta, R. River Par- 
ish Louisiana 

Col, James Tuttle Sterling, A. M., 45 Congress Street 

West Detroit, Mich. 

Frederick Devoo Tunnard, A. M Baton Rouge, La. 

William Henry Tunnard, A. B Natchitoches, La. 

1857 

Thomas Blake Brooke, A. M., 1628 Corcoran Street, 

Washington, D. C. 

Rev. C. George Currie, D. D., Christ Church, Baltimore, Md. 

Hon. Henry Heber Denison, A. B., 517 Chestnut Avenue, 

St. Louis Missouri 

Rev. Richard George Holland, A. M 

Joseph Grafton Lothrop, A. B 

1858 

Rev. Frederick M. Gray, A. M., 63 Hawk Street, Albany, 

New York 

Rev. Wyllys Hall, D. D Pasadena, Cal. 

Dr. Wm. W. Hays, A. M San Luis Obispo, Cal. 

Hon. Francis Hunt Hurd, A. M Toledo, Ohio 

Col. Jesse Elliott Jacobs, A. M. . .8 South St., Baltimore, Md. 

James Kilbourne Jones, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

Rev. John Newton Lee, D. D Topeka, Kan. 

Henry S. Mitchell, A. B Norwalk, Ohio 

Warren Munger, Jr., A. B Dayton, Ohio 

Rev. John Franklin Ohl, D. D Pomeroy, Ohio 

Lewis Paine, A. M Pomeroy, Ohio 

Rev. William Thompson. A. M Cliff St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1859 

Dr. George Smith Allen, D. D. S New York, N. Y. 

Rev. William Bower, A. M., 1420 Lombard St., Phila- 
delphia . . Pennsylvania 



KENYON COLLEGE. 79 



Rev. William Henry Dyer, A. M Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. William Crane Gray, D. D., 126 South Vine Street, 

Nashville Tennessee 

Hon. James Kent Hamilton, A. M Toledo, Ohio 

Hon. James Dent Hancock, A. M Franklin, Pa. 

Rev. John Vaughan Hilton, A. B 

John A. J. Kendig, A. M 57 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. James Hervey Lee, A. M Manhattan, Kan. 

Charles Otis Little, A. M., 160 West Winter Street, 

Delaware Ohio 

William Smedes Marshall, A. B Seattle, Wash. 

Gen. John G. Mitchell, A. B Columbus, Ohio 

Rev. Calvin Clark Parker, A. M Academy, Pa. 

Robert Clinton Smith, A. B., 5 West Fourth Street, 

Cincinnati Ohio 

Robert N. Smith, A. M 

Benjamin F. Strader, A. B., 104 East Fourth Street 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

George Daniel Stroud, A. M 

Marcus A. Woodward, A. B Pittsburgh, Pa. 

I860 

Rev. Joseph Witherspoon Cook, A. B. . . .Greenwood, S. Dak. 
James Louis Daymude, A. M., 181 Warren Avenue, 

Boston Massachusetts 

Spencer Franklin, A. B 2755 Geyer Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Samuel Griffin, A. B Bedford City, Va. 

John Arunah Harper, A. M Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Robert McNeilly, A. M 

Joseph Packard, A. M 806 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Charles Matthews Sturges, A. B., 57 Reaper Block 

Chicago, 111. 

Rev. John William Trimble, A. B Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Matthew Trimble, A. M Washington, D. C. 

Augustus Newton Whiting, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

1861 

Rev. Royal Blake Balcom, A. M Jackson, Mich. 

Prof. Thomas Brown, A. M Muscatine, Iowa 

Jesse Thomas Burr, A. B Mt. Vernon, Ohio 



v. 



80 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Prof. Samuel M. D. Clark, A. M Nashville, Tenn. 

Emanuel K. Grabill, A. B 

William Wurtz Lathrop, A. B., 123 Washington Ave- 
nue Scranton, Pa. 

Albert Bronson Payne, A. B. . . .Nashville, Tenn. 

Capt. Thomas Mackie Smith, U. S. A., A. B. . 

Elisha Marfield Tarlton, A. B 

George Taylor, A. B 

Bezaleel Wells, A. B., 39 New England Building, 

Kansas City Missouri 

George Burton Wilson, A. B Batesville, Ark. 

Rev. Yung Kiung Yen, A. M., 10 Boone Road, Shang- 
hai China 

1862 

Rev. Alexander V. G. Allen, D. D., 2 Phillips' Place, 

Cambridge : Massachusetts 

Rev. Henry Leonard Badger, A. M Portsmouth, Ohio 

Rev. Alfred Farnsworth Blake, A. M., Station I, Cincin- 
nati Ohio 

Rev. James Alexander Brown, A. B Hudson, Ohio 

Ulysses David Cole, A. M Rushville, Ind. 

Harry Lambton Curtis, A. M Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Rev. John Andrew Dooris, A. B Newton, Kan. 

Rev. William D'Orville Doty, D. D., 56 Gibbs Street, 

Rochester New York 

George Ernst, A. B Hot Creek, Nevada 

Col. James Kilbourne, A. B Columbus, Ohio 

Dr. Charles King, A. B Newark, Ohio 

Allen Napier, A. M 526 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dr. Charles Forrest Paine, A. B Troy, Pa. 

Rev. William M. Postlethwaite, D. D., Military Acad- 
emy West Point, N. Y. 

Rev. George Buffett Pratt, A. M., 176 Warren Avenue, 

Chicago Illinois 

John R. Yance, A. B 

Rev. William Edward Wright, A. M., 63 McDonough, 

Brooklyn New York 



KENYON COLLEGE. 81 



1863 

Rev. Samuel Herbert Boyer, A. M Compassville, Pa. 

Rev. Edward Dollaway, A. B Oswego, N. Y. 

Richard B. Marsh, A. M Kent, Ohio 

Charles Drake McGuffey, A. M., 14 Oak Street, Chat- 
tanooga . . Tennessee 

Rev. William Ridgley Powell, A. B Albina, Oregon 

Thomas David Rafter, A. B 

Rev. George Charles Rafter, A. B Cheyenne, Wyoming 

James Allison Searight, A. M Uniontown, Pa. 

1864 

Rev. George Bosley, A. B Boardman, Ohio 

Rev. Percy Browne, A. M., 30 Millmont Street, Roxbury, 

Boston * Massachusetts 

John Lewis Brown, A. B Aberdeen, S. Dak. 

Rev. George Galen Carter, D. D., All Saints' Church, 

Hudson New York 

George Gallagher, A. M New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Simeon Cochran Hill, A. B. .Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Frank Winfield Hubby, A. B., 851 Euclid Avenue, 

Cleveland Ohio 

Rev. William Hyde, A. 1VI Palatka, Fla. 

Samuel Marfield, A. M Knoxville, Tenn. 

Major Ernst Howard Ruffner, U. S. A., A. M., 121 

Franklin Street Buffalo, N. Y. 

Rev. Amos Skeele, A. B Rochester, N. Y. 

1865 

Upton Clarence Blake, A. B Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Charles Edward Burr, A. M., King Bld'g, Columbus, Ohio 

George Coburn, A. B 

Rev. Daniel Webster Coxe, A. M West Pittston, Pa. 

Thaddeus Edward Cromley, A. M South Bloomfield, Ohio 

George Jones Peet, A. B., 320 Broadway, New York, N.Y. - 
Henry Brown Rogers, A. M., 82 Van Buren Street, Chi- 
cago Illinois 

Rev. George Henry Smith, A. M Bridgewater, Conn. 

John Kimble Woodward. A. B Wilkesbarre, Pa. 



82 KENYON COLLEGE. 



1866 

Dr. Nathaniel Pendleton Dandridge, A. M. . .Cincinnati, Ohio 

James Burlington Graham, A. M Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Rev. John Godfrey Jones, A. M ... 

Rev. Henry Christian Mayer, A. M Pass Christian, Miss. 

Col. John James McCook, LL. D., 120 Broadway, New 

York New York 

Rev. James Kiemer Mendenhall, A. M Saratoga, N. Y. 

Rev. Charles Henry Tucker, A. M., 22 Bigelow Street, 

Cambridge Massachusetts 

1867 

Rev. Richard Julius Adler, A. B Green Island, N. Y. 

Rev. John Henry Burton, A. B Gwynedd, Pa. 

Rev. Carlos Enrique Butler, A. B Cambridge, Ohio 

Rev. James Caird, A. M Troy, N. Y. 

Rev. Edward Bentley Church, A. M., 1036 Valencie 

Street San Francisco, Cal. 

John Dawson Critchfield, A. M Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

George Gillespie Dickson, A. B 

Rev. Samuel Johnson French, A. M Sayre, Pa. 

George Alexander Hogg, A. B Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Louis Carroll McAfee, A. M.. 50 Nevada Building, San 

Francisco . California 

Rev. Isaac Newton Stanger, D. D., 1813 Vine Street, 

Philadelphia Pennsylvania 

Rev. V. P. Suvoong, A. B. Shanghai, China 

Davidson King Wade, A. B., 234 Iowa St., San Francisco, Cal. 

1868 

Rev. Hiram Payson Barnes, A. B 

Joseph Kerr Cass, A. B 

Dr. William G. L. Cheesebrough, A. B Detroit, Mich 

William Townsend Pitt Cooke, A. M Sandusky, Ohio 

Charles Bartlit Cowan, A. M Canal Winchester, Ohio 

Rev. John Gregson, A. M., 30 Oxford Place, Winchester, Mass. 
Henry Clay Hart, A. B., Second Ave. and Eighth 

Street Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. Edward Duncombe Irvine, A. M Hastings, Mich. 

George Herbert Kellogg, A. B., Ill Broadway, Oak- 
land California 



KENYON COLLEGE. 83 



John Brooks Leavitt, A. M New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Wallace W. Lovejoy, A. M., Congregational Semi- 
nary Philadelphia, Pa. 

John M. McDonald, A. B Helena, Montana 

Rev. George N. Mead, A. B., 694 Palisade Avenue, 

Hoboken New Jersey 

Wooster Beach Morrow, A. M., Blymont Building, Cin- 
cinnati Ohio 

Edwin Richard Proctor, A. B Washington C. H., Ohio 

Albert Ruth, A. B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Lyne Starling Smith, A. B Hillsboro, Ohio 

Dr. Albert Bliss Strong, A. M., 533 Monroe Street, Chi- 
cago Illinois 

Howard Hoit Weaver, A. B Urbana, Ohio 

Nevil P. Whitesides, A. B Kansas City, Mo. 

Charles G. Wilson, A. M Toledo, Mo. 

J869 

Rev. Henry Jay Camp, A. M De Luz, Cal. 

Rev. Eleutheros Jay Cooke, A. B Clinton, Iowa 

Rev. David Willis Cox, A. M Oakley, Cincinnati, Ohio 

William Francis Garrett, A. B Dorsey, Md. 

Florien Giauque, A. M Cincinnati, Ohio 

Albert Hayden, A. M 55 Lake Street, Chicago, 111. 

Desault Badlock Kirk, A. B .Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Hon. Charles Djalma Leggett, A. B Fairfield, Iowa 

Rev. Albert Burnet Nicholas, A. M New Albany, Ind. 

Samuel W. Probasco, A. B 

Rev. Albert Bronson Putnam, A. M., 1649 Euclid Ave., 

Cleveland Ohio 

Charles Webb Sadler, A. B Sandusky, Ohio 

Rev. Charles Milnor Sturgis, A. M Fernandina, Florida 

Dr. Thomas Jackson Thompson, A. B., Clifton, Staten 

Island New York 

Rev. Theodosius Stevens Tyng, A. M Tokio, Japan 

Charles Henry Wetmore, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

1870 

Rev. John Greenwood Bacchus, D. D., 239 Gates Ave,, 

Brooklyn New York 



84 KENYON COLLEGE. 



George Wyllis Cass, A. B.. 100 Washington Street, Chi- 
cago Illinois 

Frank Compton, A M., 205 La Salle Street, Chi- 
cago Illinois 

Rev. Louis De Cormis, A. M Great Neck ( L. I.), N. Y. 

William Peebles Elliott, A. B., 100 Washington 

Street Chicago, 111. 

Henry Johns Peet, A. B Ashland Block, Chicago, 111. 

Robert Callaway Soaper, A. B Henderson, Ky. 

Rev. Charles Tullidge Stout, A. M Petoskey, Mich. 

George Penny Webb, A. B: Newark, Ohio 

Harry Eugene Wilson, A. B Dubuque, Iowa 

John Scott Wilson, A. M., 322 California Street, San 

Francisco California 

Russell Jones Wilson, A. M., 202 Sansome Street, San 

Francisco .... California 

1871 

Edson Black Cartmill, A. B Lancaster, Ohio 

Rev. William Marshall Harrison, A. M., Episcopal Hos- 
pital Philadelphia, Pa. 

William Lawrence, A. B Zanesville, Ohio 

Hon. James Lawrence, A. B Cleveland, Ohio 

Dr. John Millard Lee, A. B Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Hugh Maguire, A. B., 82 Woodhull St., Brooklyn, 

New York 

Enrique Ciriaco Miller, A. M Indianapolis, Ind. 

Charles W. Tyler, A. M., Care "New York Sun," 

New York New York 

Rev. George W. Williams, A. B Sharon, Pa. 

Darwin Stanton Wolcott, A. B., Patent Office, Wash- 
ington District of Columbia 

1872 

Leonard Blake, A. B. . .2909 West Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Dr. Charles E. Bronson, A. B Washington, D. C. 

Hon. Albert Douglas, A. B Chillicothe, Ohio 

Rev. Willison Bowers French, A. M., 112 North Twelfth 

Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hon. Talfourd Park Linn, A. B Columbus, Ohio 



KENYON COLLEGE. 85 



John De W. H. McKinley, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

Percy Proctor, A. B., 127 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Andrew Lewis Ralston, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

William Henry Strong, A. M., Care u Inter-Ocean," 

Chicago Illinois 

Rev. John Hazen White, A. B Faribault, Minn. 

1873 

Dr. Charles Henry Buchanan, A. B Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Lewis William Burton, A. M., 2306 East Grace 

Street Richmond, Va. 

John M. Critchfield, A. B Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Frank Kershner Dunn, A. B 

William Matthews Raynolds, A. B Cleveland, Ohio 

John Barnett Sherwood, A. B Lafayette, Ind. 

George Franklin Southard, A. B Lima, Ohio 

Rev. Langdon Cheves Stewardson, A. B . . . .Worcester, Mass* 

1874 

Prof. John G. Black, A. M Wooster, Ohio 

Rev. Francis Key Brooke, A. M., 416 T Street, Atchison, 

Kansas 

William Thomas Colville, A. M Carbondale, Pa. 

Richard C. A. Flournoy, A. B Sioux City, Iowa 

Hon. Charles M. Ingraham, A. B., Broadway and Olive 

Streets St. Louis, Mo. 

Grayson Mills, A. B Sandusky, Ohio 

Charles Tappan, A. M 

Joseph Richard Turney, A. B Marion, Ohio 

Rev. Henry Davey Waller, A. B Flushing ( L. I.), N. Y. 

1875 

Rev. Norman Nash Badger, A. B Worthington, Ohio 

Edward Gilpin Johnson, A. B Milwaukee, Wis. 

Frank Hardick Morrison, A. B Crawford, N. J. 

Dr. Robert O'Ferrall, A. B Piqua, Ohio 

Frederick Tomlinson Peet, A. B Tacoma, Wash. 

Rev. William Wordsworth Taylor, A. B., 53d Street, 

below Media Philadelphia, Pa. 

William Franklin Webb, A. M Cincinnati, Ohio 



86 KENYON COLLEGE. 



1876 

Rev. Charles S. Aves, A. B Norwalk, Ohio 

John Charles Dunn, A. B 

Rev. Rolla Dyer, A. M •/. Cynthiana, Ky. 

Charles Clement Fisher, A. B Marion, Ohio 

James M. Greenslade, A. M Lima, Ohio 

Rev. Edward Mansfield McGuffey, A. B., St. James' 

Church Newtown ( L. I.), N. Y. 

Rev. Paul Sterling, A. M Melrose, Mass. 

Dr. Frank Pope Wilson, A. M., 711 Pine Street, San 

Francisco r . California 

1877 

Dr. Blake Axtell, A. B Painsville, Ohio 

Lieut. Harry Coupland Benson, U. S. A., A. M.. Pre- 
sidio, San Francisco California 

Dr. Robert Wood Colville, A. M Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Dr. Lorin Hall, A. M 

Harry Neville Hills, A. M Gambier, Ohio 

Rev. Henry Deane Page, A. M Tokio, Japan 

1878 

Howard Mulmann Adae, A. B Cincinnati, Ohio 

Chester Field Adams, A. M Wichita, Kan. 

Rev. Henry Dameral Aves, Ph. B. Houston, Texas 

Charles Martin Poague, A. B., 114 La Salle Street, 

Chicago Illinois 

Cassius Marcus Roberts, A. B Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Rev. Henry Herbert Smythe, A. M Falmouth, Mass. 

Dr. William Thomas Wright, A. M Denison, Iowa 

1879 

John Jay Adams, A. M Zanesville, Ohio 

Alfred Crayton Dyer, A. B Kinsley, Kan. 

Jacob Drennen Early, A. B Terre Haute, Ind. 

Willis Monro Townsend, A. B Zanesville, Ohio 

1880 

Dr. Francis Wharton Blake, A. M Columbus, Ohio 

Rev. Asahel Amos Bresee, A. B Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

Dr. Samuel Herbert Britton, A. B., Adelaide P. O., 

Marion County Ohio 



KENYON COLLEGE. 87 



Charles Franklin Colville, A. B Mt. Vernon Ohio, 

Grove Daniel Curtis, A. B., Fifty-sixth street and 

East River New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Abner Lord Fraser, A. B Lima, Ohio 

Dr. William Drake Hamilton, A. B., 146 East Long St., 

Columbus Ohio 

Dr. Charles Page Peterman, A. B., 826 La Fayette St., 

Brooklyn New York 

Rev. Charles David Williams, A. B Steubenville, Ohio 

Thomas Stokely Wood, A. B Steubenville, Ohio 

1881 

Hon. Joseph Pancoast Coates, Ph. B Portsmouth, Ohio 

John Edwin Franks, A. B Cincinnati, Ohio 

Henry Sellers Gregg, A. B St. Paul, Minn. 

Theodore Murdock Livesay, A. B., Corner High and 

Spring Streets Columbus, Ohio 

Rev. Thomas Carter Page, A. M Williamsburg, Va. 

Rev. Charles Toms Allison Pise, A. B Hamilton, Ohio 

1882 

George Frederick Anderson, A. B Sandusky, Ohio 

John Trafford Brasee, A. B Lancaster, Ohio 

Ernest Stanley Cook, A. B., 171 Franklin Street, 

Cleveland Ohio 

James Howard Dempsey, A. B., Perry Payne Build- 
ing Cleveland, Ohio 

Irving Bedell Dudley, A. B San Diego, Cal. 

Dr. Justin Julius McKenzie, A. B ..... Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

William Robert Mehaffey, Ph. B Lima, Ohio 

Rheuben Broaddus Miller, A. B 

William Clark Pennock, Ph. B., Burnet House, Cin- 
cinnati Ohio 

Dr. Edwin Frazer Wilson, A. M., lid East Broad Street, 

Columbus Ohio 

1883 

William Addison Child, Ph. B. Toronto, Canada 

Warwick Miller Cowgill, A. B Hickman, Ky. 

Andrew L. Herrlinger, A. B., Wiggins Block, Cincin- 
nati Ohio 

Dr. Thompson Barrette Wright, A. B Circleville, Ohio 



88 KENYON COLLEGE. 



1884 

Rev. George Elliott Benedict, A. B Cartersville, Ga. 

Richard Bury Bloodgood, A. B 

Joshua Douglas, Ph. B 307.1 Pine St., Chicago, 111. 

J. Edward Good, Ph. B Paige Bus Co., Akron, Ohio 

Francis Thomas Anderson Junkin, A. B., 8 Wall 

Street New York, N. Y. 

Saumel Willoughby Taylor, Ph. B Santa Ana, Cal. 

Irving Todd, Ph. B., Steward Betheny College, 

Topeka Kansas 

Charles Wardlow, Ph. B., 116] South High Street, Co- 
lumbus Ohio 

1885 

Alva Henry Anderson, A. B Shelby, Ohio 

Ernest Milnor Benedict, A. B., Walnut Street, Cincin- 
nati Ohio 

Edward Vance Bope, A. B Findlay, Ohio 

John Adolph Fritsch, A. B., Ph. B., 158 East Second 

Street, Southwest Salt Lake City, Utah 

Orion Boyd Harris, A. B Sullivan, Ind. 

George Clarence Holloway, A. B Cincinnati, Ohio 

Charles Edward Milmine, A. B., Produce Exchange, 

New York, N. Y. 

Roger Hanson Peters, A. B Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

John Franklin Smith, A. B Findlay, Ohio 

Alonzo Mitchell Snyder, A. B., Vail & Snyder, Cleve- 
land Ohio 

William Tappan, A. B., Ph. B Tivoli, N. Y. 

George William Dorman Webster, A. B Geneva, Ohio 

1886 

Clifford Lincoln Sherman Ayers, A. B Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Henry Edward Chase, A, B Wady Petra, 111. 

Hugh Barrett Clement, Ph. B., Massachusetts Institute 

Tech Boston, Mass. 

Rev. George Clarke Cox, A. B Ridge wood, N. J. 

Arthur Stanhope Dudley, Ph. B Louisville, Ky. 

Charles Probasco Harnwell, A. B Little Rock, Ark. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 89 



1887 

Cleveland Keith Benedict, A. B Steubenville, Ohio 

Curtis Claypoole, A. B., 1050 North High Street, Co- 
lumbus Ohio 

Rev. William Herbert Dewart, A. B., Trinity Church, 

Columbus Ohio 

Robert Matthew Greer, Ph. B Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Lawrence Perus Hancock, A. B., 14 West Seneca St., 

Buffalo New York 

Ralph Sheldon Holbrook, A. M., Gardner Place, 

Toledo Ohio 

George Arthur Reid, Ph. B Ashtabula, Ohio 

Walter Wright Scranton, Ph. B Knoxville, Tenn. 

Hugh Sterling, Ph. B 2907 Chestnut St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Charles Huntington Young, A. B Chamberlain, S. Dak. 

Rev. James Henry Young, A. B Dennison, Ohio 

1888 

Henry Curtis Devin, Ph. B Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Walstein Failing Douthirt, Ph. B., King Building, 

Columbus Ohio 

Rev, George Fiske Dudley, A. B., St. Stephen's House, 

Oxford England 

Guy Despard Goff, A. M., 1021 Exchange Building, Bos- 
ton Massachusetts 

Clifford Alfred Neff, A. B., Wilshire Building, Cleve- 
land Ohio 

George Henry Prince, A. B., 129 North Spring St,, Los 

Angeles California 

Rev. John David Skilton, A. M., Prospect Street, Cleve- 
land Ohio 

Henry Bedinger Swearingen, A. B., Pension Office, 

Washington District of Columbia 

Charles Avery Tappan, Ph. B Steubenville, Ohio 

Robert Chochung Woo, Ph. B Shanghai, China 

4889 

Rev. Charles Henry Arndt, A. M Philadelphia, Pa. 

Charles Edward Bemiss, Ph. B., Carlisle Building, Cin- 
cinnati Ohio 



90 KENYON COLLEGE. 



Frank Sanford Curtis, A. B Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Henry Jacob Eberth, A. M Gambier, Ohio 

Frederick William Harnwell, Ph. B 

Rev. Gibson William Harris, A. B Oberlin, Ohio 

David Feldman Kronacher, Ph. B Cincinnati, Ohio 

Rev. Edward Thomas Mabley, A. B Philadelphia, Pa. 

George Dudley Young, Ph. B Plankinton, S. Dak. 

1890 

William Budd Bodine, Jr., A. B Hoboken, N. J. 

Frank Hadley Ginn, Ph. B., Wilshire Building, 

Cleveland Ohio 

Sherman Moorhead Granger, A. B Zanesville, Ohio 

Wilbur Edward Irvine, Ph. B Springfield, Ohio 

Henry Lincoln McClellan, Ph. B Wellington, Ohio 

Rev. William Edward Rambo, A. B Lancaster, Ohio 

Robert Sterling, A. B Boise City, Idaho 

John Francis Wilson, A. B Napoleon, Ohio 

Lee Huntington Young, Ph. B., Fiftieth Street and 

Woodland Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 

1891 

Rev. Owen John Davis, A. B Gambier, Ohio 

William Hahn Foley, A. B Gambier, Ohio 

Rollin Barnard Hubbard, Ph. B 

Josiph S. Motoda, A. B., Corner Fiftieth Street and 

Woodland Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 

1892 

Guy H. Buttolph ■ . . . ' Gambier, Ohio 

Henry W. Buttolph Galesburg, 111. 

Will Pearce Carpenter 

Louis E. Durr Gambier, Ohio 

William N. Kennedy, 248 West Fifty-Fourth Street, 

New York, N. Y. 

Paul Morrison, 248 West Fifty-Fourth Street, New 

York New York 

Charles Thomas Walkley Gambier, Ohio 

William S. Walkley 

Lewis C. Williams Gambier, Ohio 



KENYON COLLEGE. 91 



(graduates of tfye Cfyeological Seminary. 

1834 

Rev. Heman Dyer, D. D 2 Bible House, New York, N. Y. 

1837 

Rev. John Selwood Milwaukee, Oregon 

1838 

Rev. John Foster Athens, Tenn. 

1839 

Rev. George B. Sturges New Albany, Ind. 

1842 

Rev. Moses H. Hunter, 460 Louisiana Avenue, Wash- 
ington District of Columbia 

Henry L. Richards, A. M., 36 Church Street, Win- 
chester Massachusetts 

1843 

Rev. Levi L. Holden Williamsburg, Kan. 

Rev. Albert T. McMurphy West Vincent, Pa. 

1845 

Rev. Joash Rice Taylor, A. M., 38 Bleecker Street, New 

York New York 

1846 

Rev. Charles Arey, D. D., 5 Falmouth Street, Boston, 

Massachusetts 

Rev. John W. Cracraft, A. M Wooster, Ohio 

Rev. George W. DuBois, D. D Essex, N. Y. 

Rev. William Miller Hot Springs, Ark. 

1848 

Rev. Thomas S. Goodwin, A. M. . 

1850 

Rev. John Boyd, D. D Marietta, Ohio 

1852 

Rev. Columbus S. Doolittell, A. M Mansfield, Ohio 

Rev. James G. Pattison, M. D England 



92 KENYON COLLEGE. 



1853 

Rev. Edward C. Benson, A. M Gambier, Ohio 

Rev. Francis Granger, A. M., 115 Fifteenth Street, 

Buffalo New York 

Rev. Joseph E. Ryan E. Des Moines, Iowa 

Rev. James Trimble, A. M Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 

1854 

Peter Neff, A. M Cleveland, Ohio 

1855 

Rev. John Hochuly, A. B Fairfield, Iowa 

1856 

Rev. Moses Hamilton, A. M Bellevue, Ohio 

Peter H. Jeffreys Newport, Ky. 

Rev. Warren H. Roberts Northford, Conn. 

1857 

Rev. John H. C. Bonte, D. D Berkeley, Cal. 

Rev. Charles George Currie, D. D., Christ's Church, 

Baltimore Maryland 

Rev. Benjamin T. Noakes, D. D., Bolton Avenue, Cleve- 
land Ohio 

1858 

Rev. Cornelius S. Abbott Belleville, N. J. 

Rev. Henry H. Messenger, A. M Beaumont, Texas 

1859 

Rev. Richard L. Ganter, D. D Akron, Ohio 

Rev. William C. Gray, D. D., 126 Vine Street, Nash- 
ville Tennessee 

Rev. Richard Holden Brazil 

I860 

Rev. Frederick M. Gray, A. M., 6 South Hawk Street, 

Albany New York 

Rev. Salmon R. Weldon 

1861 

Rev. John Creighton Blockstock, Ontario, Canada 

Rev. Wyllys Hall, D. D. Pasadena, Cal. 

Rev. John F. Ohl, D. D Pomeroy, Ohio 

Hon. William K. Rodgers, A. M 

Rev. Samuel S. Spear Fall River, Mass. 

Rev. William Thompson, A. M. . .98 Cliff St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 93 



1862 

Rev. William Bower, A. M., 1614 Sumner Street, Phila- 
delphia Pennsylvania 

Rev. Richard S. Cooper Invermay, Canada 

Rev. William H. Dyer, A. M Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. John Ireland Eckley, Pa. 

Rev. George H. Jencks, M. D., 321 Geary Street, San 

Francisco California 

Rev. Henry D. Lathrop, D. D East Oakland, Cal. 

Rev. James Hervey Lee, A. M Manhattan, Kan. 

Rev. Edward Softley, 590 Hamilton Road, London, 

Ontario Canada 

Rev. Albin E. Tortat, M. D Wissahickon, Pa. 

Rev. William Turner 

1863 

Rev. John G. Ames, A. M., 1600 Thirteenth Street, 

Northwest Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Herman L. Duhring, 416 Spruce Street, Philadel- 
phia Pennsylvania 

Rev. William C. Mills, 209 Fair Oaks Street, San Fran- 
cisco California 

Rev. William H. Nelson, Jr.. D. D 

J864 

Rev. John A. Aspinwall, 17 Du Pont Circle, Northwest, 

Washington District of Columbia 

Rev. William B. Bodine, D. D Asbury Park, N. J. 

Rev. Abbott Brown, A. M., 59 Wall Street, New York, 

New York 

Rev. Thomas Burrows Kennett Square, Pa. 

Chester I. Chapin 

Rev. Joshua Cowpland, A. M Medina, Pa. 

Rev. Josiah F. Curtis 

Rev. Benjamin Hartley Moberly, Mo. 

Rev. William A. Holbrook. Easthampton, Mass. 

Rt. Rev. J. M. Kendrick, D. D Albuquerque, N. M. 

Rev. Charles E. Murray, A. M., 1015 Washington Street, 

Wilmington Delaware 

Rev. John F. Woods Wheeling, W. Va. 



94 KENYON COLLEGE. 



1865 

Rev. John A. Dooris, A. B Newton, Kan. 

Edward Hubbell 

Rev. William R. Powell, A. B Albina, Oregon 

William M. Ross Princeton, Ky. 

Rev. William R. Woodbridge, A. M Port Henry, N. Y. 

1866 

Rev. Samuel H. Boyer, A. M., 120 Claymont Street, 

Philadelphia Pennsylvania 

Rev. David H. Greer, D. D., 342 Madison Avenue, New 

York New York 

Rev. William M. Poslethwaite, D. D West Point, N. Y. 

1867 

Rev. Henry L. Badger, A. M Portsmouth, Ohio 

Rev. Alfred F. Blake, A. M Station I, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Rev. Carlos E. Butler, A. B Cambridge, Ohio 

Rev. William Hyde, A. M. . . .543 Clinton St. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rev. Joseph S. Jenckes, LL. D., 210 North Meridian 

Street Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rev. William S. Langford, D. D., 22 Bebb House, New 

York New York 

1868 

Rev. Royal B. Balcom, A. M Jackson, Mich. 

Rev. George Bosley, A. B Boardman, Ohio 

John Godfrey Jones 

1869 

Rev. Wilfrid H. Dean Copenhagan, N. Y. 

Rev. William J. Petrie. . .700 Fullerton Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

4870 

Rev. Hosea W. Jones, D. D Gambier, Ohio 

Rev. William Lucas Fresno, Cal. 

1871 

Rev. Hugh Ely 

Rev. Stephen W. Garrett Canon City, Col. 

Rev. Edward D. Irvine, A. M Hastings, Mich. 

Rev. Augustus R. KiefFer, A. M Colorado Springs, Col. 

Robert A. McElhinney 

Rev. Albert B. Nicholas, A. M New Albany, Ind. 



Errata. 



N. B. — Names and addresses of living Alumni only, are to 
be found on pages 75 to 95. 

Notice of all changes in address should be sent at once to 
Secretary of Faculty. 

PAGE 

75. Read — Rev. Charles Edward Douglass, A. M , Belvedere, N. J. 

75. Dr. Lane died at Chicago, January 3, 1893. 

76. Ex-President Hayes died at Fremont, 0., January 17, 1893. 
76. Read — Rev. Joash Rice Taylor, A. M., Saugatuck, Mich. 

76. " Maj. Jacob A. Camp, A. M., U. S. A., 163 Dodge Street, 
Cleveland, 0. 

" William Kinney, A. B., Portsmouth, O. 

78. " William Henry Tunnard, A. B., Shreveport r La. 

78. u Rev. John Newton Lee, D D , Joliet, 111. 

78. " Rev. William Thompson, A.M., 98 Cliff St , Pittsburgh, Pa. 

79. " Rt, Rev. William Crane Gray, D. D., Orlando, Fla. 
79. " Rev. John Trimble, A. B., New York, N. Y. 

79. " Allen Napier, A. M., 526 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

80. u Rev. James Alexander Brown, A. B., Ravenna, O. 
80. u Rev. John Andrew Dooris, A. B., Great Bend, Kas. 

80. " George Ernst, A. B., Belmont, Nevada. 

81. u Rev. Samuel Herbert Boyer, A. M., 1033 Snyder Avenue, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

81. u Rev. William Hyde, A.M., 543 Clinton St.Brooklyn,N.Y. 

81. " George Coburn, A. B., Baltimore, Md. 

81. u Rev. Daniel Webster Coxe, A. M., Nanticoke, Pa. 

82. " Rev. John Godfrey Jones, A. M., Perry ton, O. 

82. " Rev. John Gregson, A. M., 3 Oxford Place, Winchester, 
Mass. 

82. u Rev. Edward Duncombe Irvine, A. M., Troy, O. 

83. '• John Brooks Leavitt, A. M., Ill Broadway, N. Y. City. 
83 Howard Hoit Weaver, A. B., is dead. 

83. Read— Charles G. Wilson, A.M., Toledo, O. 

83. " Rev. Eleutheros Cooke, A. B., Cleveland. O. 

83. u Rev. Charles Milnor Sturges, Millidgeville, Ga. 



PAGE 

84. Read— William Peebles Elliott, A. M., 100 Washington Street, 
Chicago, 111. 

84. " Charles W. Tyler, A M. } care New York World, N. Y.City. 

84. Dorwin Stanton Wolcott, A. B address unknown. 

84. Read— Dr. Charles E. Bronson, A. B., 1334 Corcoran Street, 

Washington, D. C. 

85. Rt. Rev. Francis Key Brooke, D. D., Guthrie, Oklahoma. 

85. Rev. William Wordsworth Taylor, A. B., Hastings, Mich. 

86. u Dr. Lorin Hall, A. M., Pasadena, Cal. 

87. Rev. Abner Lord Frazer. A. B., Youngstown, O. 

87. u Rev. Charles D. Williams, Trinity House, Cleveland, O. 

87. Rev. Charles Toms Allison Pise, A. B., Marietta, Ga. 

88. Rev. Ernest Milnor Benedict, A. B., Xenia, O. 

88. George William Dorman Webster, A. M., Geneva, O. 

89. " Rev. Cleveland Keith Benedict, A. B., Steubenville, O. 
89. " Rev. William Herbert Dewart, A. B., Faribault, Minn. 
89. " Hugh Sterling, Ph.B., Sligo Iron Store Co., St. Louis,Mo. 
89. Rev. James Henry Young, A. M., Dennison, O. 

89. " Rev. John Davis Skilton, A. M., 901 Prospect Street, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

90. " Robert Sterling, A. B., North Yakima, Wash. 

90. " Rev. Lee Huntington Young, Ph. B., Cor. 50th Street 

and Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
90. " Rollin Barnard Hubbard, Ph. B., 2199 Devisadero Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
90. M Joseph S. Motoda, A. B., Cor. 50th St. and Woodland 

Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
90. 4t Guy H. Buttolph, A. B., Gambier O. 
90. t4 Henry W. Buttolph, A. B., Galesburg, 111. 
90. " Will Pearce Carpenter, Ph. B., 128 Walnut Street, Cin- 
cinnati, O. 
90. " Louis E Durr, A. B., Gambier, O. 

90. " William N. Kennedy, A. B,, 248 W. 54th St., N. Y. City. 
90. " Paul Morrison, A. B., 248 W. 54th St., New York, N. Y. 
90. u Charles Thomas Walkley, A. B., Gambier, O. 
90. " William S. Walkley, A. B., 13 Bellingham St. Chelsea, 

Boston, Mass. 

90. " Lewis C. Williams, A. B., Gambier, O. 

91. Rev. John Selwood, died August 27, 1892. 

91. Read — Rev. Joash Rice Taylor, A. M., Saugatuck, Mich. 

91. Rev. Columbus S. Doolittle, A. M., is dead. 

92. Read— Peter Neff, A. M., 361 Russell Ave., Cleveland O. 

92. " . Rt. Rev. William Crane Gray, D. D., Orlando, Fla. 

93. " Rev. William Bower, A. M., 1420 Lombard Street, Phila- 

delphia, Pa. 



PAGE 



93. Read— William Turner, Chicago, 111. 
93. Rev. William C. Mills, died January 20, 1892. 
93. Read— William H. Neilson, Sr., D. D., Sheperdstown, W. Va. 
93. " William B. Bodine, D. D., Church of the Saviour, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 
93. Rev. Joshua Cowpland, A. M., Media, Pa. 

93. Rev. Benjamin Hartley, San Gabriel, Cal. 

93. " Rev. John F. Woods, Moundsville, W. Va. 

94. Rev. John A. Dooris, A. B., Great Bend, Kan. 

94. " Rev. William R. Woodbridge, A. M., Morristown, N. Y. 

94. u Rev. Samuel H. Boyer, A. M., 1033 Snyder Avenue, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 

94. " Rev. William M. Postlethwaite. D. D., West Point, N.Y. 

94. " Rev. Joseph S. Jenckes, D. D., LL. D., 210 N. Meridian 
Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

94. " Rev. William S. Langford, D. D., 22 Bible House, New 
York, N. Y. 

94. u Rev. John Godfrey Jones, A. M., Perryton, O. 

94. " Rev. Wilfrid H. Dean, Greenville, O. 

94. " Rev. John Hugh Ely, College Hill, Cincinnati, O. 

94. " Rev. Edward D. Irvine, A. M., Troy, O. 

95. " Rev. Charles M. Sturges, A. M., Millidgevitt, Ga. 
95. u Rev. John C. Sage, 451 Sixth St., Toledo, O. 

95. " Rev. G. Sherman Burrows, Brockport, N. Y. 

95. " Rev. James Sheerin, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

95. u Rev. Orville E. Watson, A. B., Trinity House, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

95. 4i Rev. Lee H. Young, A. B., 50th St. and Woodland Ave., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Correct to January 30, 1893. 



KENYON COLLEGE. 95 



1872 

Rev. Charles G. Adams, A. M., 26 University Place, New 

York New York 

Rev. Henry J. Camp, A. M De Luz, Cal. 

Rev. David W. Cox, A. M Oakley, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Rev. Albert B. Putnam, A. M., 1649 Euclid Ave., Cleve- 
land , Ohio 

Rev. Charles M. Sturges, A. M Fernandina, Fla. 

1873 

Rev. Cyrus S. Bates, D. D Case Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 

Edson B. Cartmill, A. B Lancaster, Ohio 

1878 

Rev. Norman N. Badger, A. B Worthington, Ohio 

1882 

Rev. Lewis Brown, Corner Findlay and Baymiller Sts., 

Cincinnati Ohio 

Rev. James Henry Davet Zellwood, Fla. 

Rev. Clarence Croft Leman Mobile, Ala. 

1883 

Rev. Henry D. Aves, Ph. B Houston, Texas 

Rev. George B. Van Waters East Portland, Oregon 

1886 
Rev. Arthur B. Howard, Findlay and Baymiller Sts., 

Cincinnati Ohio 

1887 

Rev. Asahel A. Bresee, A. B Mauch Chuck, Pa. 

1891 

Rev. John C. Loge 

1892 

Rev. C. Fred. Brookins, A. B Cincinnati, Ohio 

Rev. G. Sherman Burrows Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Colwort K. P. Cogswell, A. B Wellsville, Ohio 

Rev. Howard M. Ingham Cleveland, Ohio 

Rev. Harold Morse Cleveland, Ohio 

Rev. William E. Rambo, A. B Lancaster, Ohio 

Rev. James Sherrin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Orville E. Watson, A. B Cleveland, Ohio 

Lee H. Young, A. B Philadelphia, Pa. 




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